May 15, 2024

Woodland Blooms for
Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day

Trillium group

It's a joy when the native woodland plants take the stage for their brief spring performance. While some of these photos were taken a few days ago, and the blooms are fading a bit, it's time to celebrate them for May's Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day.

Trillium grandiflorum

The Trilliums seem so joyful and bright, with plenty of rain and sun this spring. And the temperatures have been cool to comfortable, which has kept them blooming longer. Great White Trillium (T. grandiflorum) is plentiful, and always takes center stage at this time of year.

Trillium recurvatum

Prairie Trillium (Trillium recurvatum) appeared here only a few years ago, and I'm thrilled to see it returning each spring since. Some of its other nicknames are interesting: Toadshade or Bloody Butcher.

Trillium erectum

Red Trillium (T. erectum) also has some other fun nicknames: Wake Robin, Purple Trillium, Bethroot, or Stinking Benjamin. It's appeared in the back woodland for many years, but the patch appears to be expanding--yay!

Podophyllum peltatum

Then, we have the Mayapples (Podophyllum peltatum), which create an excellent groundcover, with beautiful flowers under the foliage. Conventional wisdom is that when the leaves are horizontal and the plants are blooming, it's time for Morel mushrooms. I've never found any Morels here near home (although we've found some up at the cottage).

Galium aparine

Catchweed Bedstraw or Stickywilly (Galium aparine) is pretty, even if it sticks to your clothing as you pass by. I like the way it blends with the ferns.

Viola sororia 1

Viola pubescens

Viola sororia 2

Several species of Violets (Viola spp.) are still blooming. There are so many in the woods, and I welcome them since they compete well with the non-native, invasive plants.

Viburnum trilobum

The Highbush Cranberries (Viburnum trilobum) are approaching peak bloom time (several days after this photo was taken). The flowers attract butterflies, bees, and other pollinators.

Asarum canadense

Wild Ginger (Asarum canadense) has fun little flowers under its foliage. This plant has expanded at the woodland edge, which is wonderful because it also competes well with invasive plants.

Hydrophyllum virginianum

Some Virginia Waterleaf (Hydrophyllum virginianum) plants are blooming...but I think they're even prettier just before the buds break--so delicate and fuzzy.

Arisaema triphyllum

And, of course, it's always a thrill to find Jack-in-the-Pulpit (Arisaema triphyllum) flowers. They help define the native woodland, and it's fun to observe insects attracted to them.

Soon many of these plants will fade and/or go dormant with the coming heavy shade and heat of summer. So it's fun to celebrate them now. Thanks to May Dreams Gardens for hosting Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day! What's blooming in your garden?

38 comments:

  1. That's a lovely collection of woodland flowers, Beth. All would shudder with dismay if planted in my garden :(

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's fun to compare notes--when we share similar plants AND totally different ones. Happy GBBD!

      Delete
  2. I love that so many of these photos were taking after a spring rain! Those trilliums are just lovely! The Catchweed Bedstraw is common here as well, though it's long past its time. Those seeds have dropped and they're just waiting for next February and March! Nice set of May blooms, Beth! Tina

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, the raindrops offer magical notes. :) It's been a lovely spring with plenty of rain and sun, so we're blessed. Happy GBBD!

      Delete
  3. I do like trillium. They remind me of vacations, and our own my father grew. They were the deep red ones.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm thrilled to have three species of Trilliums here that occurred naturally. I didn't plant any of them. The Great Whites seem to move around a bit, but the others always reappear in the same locations. The Prairie Trilliums are relatively new to us on this property, during the 20+ years that we've lived here. They all seem magical to me.

      Delete
  4. What a vivid red Trillium! I have one of that species that is much paler in color. So interesting to see the difference. Our Great White Trilliums are blooming right now as well. Such a pristine moment in mid-May. Happy GBBD Beth!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, sometimes the colors seem to depend on the time of day and the light conditions. Sometimes it looks very dark--almost dark magenta. The Great Whites are so regal and yet so cheery, aren't they?

      Delete
  5. Beautiful wildflowers!
    Happy Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Lea. Yes, it's wonderful to welcome the wildflowers' growth and blooming each May. :)

      Delete
  6. Beautiful blooms of your woodland flowers. Love the Trillium! Happy Bloom Day.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks. :) The Trilliums define the back woodland in springtime. And all the others join in the song!

      Delete
  7. Apart from the violets, all of the woodland flowers are new to me. I find the Trilliums rather interesting - the name says it all! - so will look them up to see if they would enjoy living in my subtropical climate. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Jo: You're in Australia, right? You have so many amazing plants there. Australia is definitely on my list for future travel. :)

      Delete
  8. These are beautiful. I love it. Thank you for sharing.
    www.rsrue.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  9. Fantastic! Leaving for southeast SD shortly, fingers crossed for plenty of flower color!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hope you have a great trip! I'll look forward to your blog coverage afterward!

      Delete
  10. Oh, these are some lovely shots of your woodland garden. The dark PrairieTrillium is really stunning!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! Nature provides these gifts, and it's such a joy to see them return every year. :)

      Delete
  11. I love seeing all these exotic looking plants over across the atlantic, england feels very tame in comparison. Loving the wild ginger:-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Martine: Thanks for stopping by! I don't know...many of your plants (and you can grow so many because of your climate) amaze me! The Wild Ginger is a great, sturdy, native ground cover here.

      Delete
  12. I love your collection of woodland flowers, especially the Trilliums and of course the Jack-in-the-Pulpit. which always fascinates me! Happy Bloom Day!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They are wonderful gifts from nature--none planted by me. Thanks for stopping by!

      Delete
  13. Beautiful photos... I do love these spring beauties.
    Carla

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Carla. Yes, the are great gifts and fun to see every spring. :)

      Delete
  14. I first saw white trilliums when we took a car trip to Ottawa, Canada in 1988. It was early May and all the woods along the roads were covered in them. I have a red trillium in my shade yard and its flower has never opened completely. It didn't this year, either, but no matter. I remember mayapples from when I lived in rural Arkansas years ago. Your post brought back a lot of memories.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, good, it's always fun to remember good times. Your car trip sounds lovely! We drove from central Wisconsin to Ottawa when I was a teenager. It was a wonderful family trip. Ontario is beautiful!

      Delete
  15. I so envy your wildflower garden! I'm trying to establish one here at the border of the woods in back of my house, but it's a struggle. Ironically, about seven miles from where I live, the largest stand of Trillium grandiflora on the east coast is found--the Thompson Wildlife Management Area. There they have trilliums of all colors, white, pink, cerise, and in-between that cover acres of land, and they are stunning. One of these days I'll do a posting on that. Right now the spring ephemerals in our area are about done for the year.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wow, the Thompson Wildlife Management Area sounds fabulous! I hope I can make it out there sometime. I hope to catch your post if/when you do one on the Trilliums. :) Sadly, our spring ephemerals are winding down, too.

      Delete
  16. What lovely native plants! The Trilliums are especially beautiful.

    We have native blooming plants in the neighborhood, but quite different from your woodland gems.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They are special, and I'm so happy to see them every spring. I didn't plant any--they're truly gifts of nature. I know native plants in your part of the country are very special, too. :)

      Delete
  17. So many beautiful blooms and also foliage. The color of the last two trillium is so rich and deep.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Angie: Yes, the Trilliums are striking. I noticed some are still blooming, but most are sadly fading now. Spring passes too fast.

      Delete
  18. What a gorgeous collection of woodlanders, Beth. The trilliums are lovely - and your photographs of all the flowers are excellent. I particularly love the Red Trillium (T. erectum).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Catherine. It's a joy to see them every spring. I only wish the blooms would last longer. I have to make an effort to slow down and enjoy them, because spring passes way too fast. <3

      Delete
  19. So many Spring flowers blooming these days. I have many of those you posted in my garden here on the shore of Lake Michigan, but no Trillium. Have to hike the trails in Door County to see them. Nice posting today Beth.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, spring is bright and colorful, isn't it? It's been many years since I've been to Door County in the spring. When we lived near Green Bay when I was a kid, I think we visited in the spring. But most of my trips to Door County have been in the summer...of course an equally stunning time to be there. :)

      Delete

DEAR ANONYMOUS VISITORS: Please include your FIRST NAME. We need to know you're a real person. Security updates mean your comments likely will NOT be published unless you include your name. Sorry. Also, comments with hyperlinks might not make it through the heightened security system.

Your comment might not appear right away (even though we love you). PlantPostings uses comment moderation, and we read every comment before we publish.

Thanks for stopping by! Have a great gardening day!