October 04, 2017

Candids of Katy in Tropical Terrain

katydid 1

tropical

katydid 2

katydid 3

katydid 4

katydid 5

katydid eyes

[Genus: Scudderia?]

Wordless Wednesday

Wildlife Wednesday

Wednesday Vignette

52 comments:

  1. Oh Beth, you've outdone yourself on the stunning photos! I think my favorite are the two where the katydid is eyeballing the blooms--such an intense look! Thanks for joining in--enjoyed this!

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    1. Thank you, Tina. Apparently, katydids are known to be good photo subjects. They hold still for a long time, and they don't move very fast until they jump. ;-) I do have some video of this little one moving very slowly off the plant. Fascinating. Thanks for hosting the WW meme!

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    1. Thank you, Lisa. The katydid was a cooperative subject. :)

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    1. Thank you, Deborah. They are fascinating creatures!

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  4. Oh, those are some great shots! Love the look on his face - you really captured his personality! Love it!

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    1. Thanks! He did seem to be watching me intently--probably figuring how to make his getaway successfully, and he did eventually. :)

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  5. charming captures Beth - up close and personal. Had to check out your bush cricket as to why he has that name - and now I know why they sing 'katy did' in Fleischer's 'Hoppity goes to town'

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    1. Thanks, Laura. Yes, we have the common katydids here, too. During the late summer they chirp, "Katy-did, Katy-didn't," all night long. I think this species in these photos has a slightly different call. But they're all awesome creatures!

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  6. Fantastic photos! My grandson would love these--he has to search for praying mantises and count cicada shells every time he comes over to our house:)

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    1. Your grandson sounds like an awesome young man. Praying mantises and cicadas are fascinating, too! Thanks, Rose.

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  7. What a handsome critter and very well photographed!

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    1. Yes, it is definitely handsome. :) Thanks, Peter.

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    1. Thank you, Aaron. He/she was a cooperative subject, and looked so beautiful among the Tropical Milkweed blooms. :)

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  9. What a lovely plant and cricket, your photos are stunning.
    Amanda xx

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    1. Thank you, Amanda. The plant and the katydid were begging for the candids, and were very cooperative subjects on a beautiful, calm day. I will remember this day with fondness in the middle of white, cold winter. :)

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  10. In total agreement ... terrific photos! I especially like the ones with close focus but where it's clear what's in the blurred background. Still working on that kind of control.

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    1. Thank you, Hollis. My camera has some great macro settings that allow for various levels of manual and/or automatic controls. It works really well in dappled shade, too, which is great in this garden. It helped that the little buddy didn't move much, until he got tired of my snapping his photo. ;-)

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  11. OH MY ... I love it.

    We will be off on our adventure to Madison Monday - Thursday.
    We plan to visit Durward's Glen. I would like to take some photos of Sam for senior portraits during our trip.
    Thank you again for posting Durward's Glen, I saved your post in my inbox, so I would remember to plan it in our trip itinerary.

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    1. Oh gosh, enjoy Durward's Glen! It's a beautiful place. Hopefully, the rain has helped with the dryness we've had lately, and the gardens will be refreshed. Have a wonderful time in the Madison area!

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  12. How fun! That little guy really does camouflage himself well, though!

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    1. Yes, he/she was made to blend in with foliage, for sure. If I hadn't been looking closely, I would have missed the little buddy. :)

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  13. I love these guys and how cooperative he is....Thank you for your comment on my blog..the move in Congress to get rid of the Endangered Species Protections sent me over the edge...sigh.....Michelle

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    1. Yes, he/she was so fun to study and photograph. You are welcome! Your writing is so thought-provoking, Michelle. And as I said, you are part of the solution! Bless you!

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    1. Yes, the little buddy graced me with his/her presence in the garden. Such a beautiful creature. :)

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  15. Wow - amazing! She (he??) blends in so well in that 1st photo that I missed them and had to go back!

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    1. Yes, isn't nature amazing? If I hadn't looked closely, I wouldn't have noticed the katydid.

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  16. Love these shots! For some reason I only see these guys late in the season.

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    1. Thanks, Jason. I think that's typical for their numbers to increase toward the end of the growing season. I was reading that somewhere. Lots to learn about these fascinating creatures. :)

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  17. It is amazing how he blends in so well. Nature is really amazing!
    Thanks for sharing!
    - Lisa

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    1. Yes, the camouflage is amazing, isn't it? I wasn't sure if it was a male or female, but I think it's a female because of the ovipositor on the tail for laying eggs.

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  18. What great photos! Aside from a lot of more familiar pollinators I haven't seen anything as exotic as katydids in my garden.

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    1. Thanks, Pat. It's exciting to see any pollinators and insects this late in the season. :)

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  19. Wonderful pics! Amazing, that bug seems to have quite an expressive face.

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    1. Thanks, Deb. Yes, I suppose they do observe us when we approach. I wonder what they see? It must be pretty scary. LOL.

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  20. Stunning . . .
    Brilliant orange red . . .
    Wonderful photos!

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    1. Thanks, Lynne. I love the Tropical Milkweed blooms. This is my first year growing them--I really love the plant and the colors, and the Monarchs do, too!

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  21. Sorry Katy . . .
    Your green is beautiful too . . .

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    1. Ha! I'm sure Katy didn't take offense. She's happy to blend in. :)

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  22. His/her little face has so much personality, like it's looking at you wondering what the heck you're doing!

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    1. I know--I think the little buddy was probably scared looking at a giant human with a camera poking out. I wasn't sure if it was male or female, but I think it's a female because of the ovipositor on the tail for laying eggs. Fun little creatures. :)

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  23. So that's a katydid? I've heard of them, but never realized what they were called. What fantastic photos you've captured!

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    1. Thank you, Karen! Yes, it's one species of katydid. From what I've read, this particular genus is called a "false katydid," though they consider it a type of katydid. I know we have several types of katydids here, because I hear their songs at night during late summer into early fall. Love them. :)

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  24. What a fun photo shoot -- and beautiful blossoms, too!

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    1. Thank you, Heather. The Tropical Milkweed is a beautiful plant. It's not native, but it's a nice annual in pots, and the monarch caterpillars really like to eat it. So, it attracts monarch mamas laying eggs, and then adult butterflies, other pollinators, and other insects. I really like the blooms!

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