June 25, 2024

A Climbing Rose That's Captured My Heart

rose 1

I wish I'd known more about this Rose years ago. It's Rosa setigera, with the nicknames Climbing Prairie Rose, Illinois Rose, Climbing Wild Rose, and several others. While it's not technically native in my county, it's native two counties to the south and east, and it's now found often in S. Wisconsin. Its native range stretches from New York state in the northeast, west to Iowa and south to Texas.

I purchased the Rose three years ago to climb on the backyard arbor. It wasn't happy with the drought last summer, but it continued to grow and is really coming into its own this year.

shifting shade

Climbing Prairie Rose grows well in open, sunny prairies, but it also thrives in partial shade. So the spot on the arbor is perfect for it. This summer, the buds and blooms are plentiful. The flowers are gorgeous, 2-3 inches across, and they have a slight, pleasant scent.

arbor entrance

Here you can see the plant on the arbor (which the fishman constructed in 2009), leading into the backyard. I've grown many things on this arbor--mostly annuals like Hyacinth Bean Vine (Lablab purpureus) and the perennial Kentucky Wisteria (W. macrostachya), which was here when we moved in more than 20 years ago. I now grow the Hyacinth Bean Vine in another garden location. The Wisteria is still on one side of the arbor, but...long story for another post.

bud 1

I'm in love with this nearly native Rose, as a perfect climber for the arbor, and because of its hardiness, easy care, and beauty. The day I took these photos, the buds I saw in the morning were open a couple of hours later. It was fun to observe their unfurling, like a time-lapse movie.

couple 1
9:57 a.m.

couple 2
12:02 p.m.

Same "couple," in the morning and at midday.

rose 2

What can I say? I'm in love, and I'm thrilled that Rosa setigera is settling in on the arbor.

I'm linking in to Wildflower Wednesday over at Clay and Limestone. Check it out!

26 comments:

  1. Your climbing rose is absolutely beautiful, Beth - I can understand why you love it. As an aside, I've seen Hyacinth bean vine growing in my local botanic garden in years past and have wanted to try it here but I've yet to get around to it.

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    1. This is the first year it's really taking off, and I'm so happy. It will be interesting to see its progress over time. I highly recommend Hyacinth Bean Vine. It performs well here, but grows even better in sunnier locations. I've seen it in several public garden settings in warmer climates and climates similar to my own, but mostly in sunny gardens. It takes over an arbor or a trellis when grown in full sun. Love it in partial shade, though, too.

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  2. That's a lovely, sweet rose! Even better a native to your region. Perhaps it was native to your very area before European settlement?

    OMG what a gorgeous Hosta framed by the Fishman's arbor. One genus we can't grow here. I love seeing them!

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    1. Good question. I’m just so thrilled that it’s so beautiful and works so well on the arbor. Re: the Hosta…we have so many here, and all of them were here when we moved in so long ago. I’ve done a few divisions and transplants, but I haven't had to buy any. They like the shady backyard.

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  3. That's a really pretty one! I like the simple flowers.

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    1. It's really captured my heart for some reason. I agree: The simplicity is part of its charm. :)

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  4. Oh Beth what a beautiful rose and what a view of the backyard. I miss the native swamp rose I planted in our old garden. The scent and the thousands of bees it drew into my veg garden there. Thanks for the beauty and memories.

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    1. Thanks. :) I'm going to miss so many things when we move...no news, just thinking ahead. It will be hard to decide which cuttings of plants I should take along to the new place.

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  5. It's gorgeous. Love the arbor.

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    1. Isn't it a beauty? And it's continuing to move along the top of the arbor. I'll have to decide what to do when it starts down the other side.

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  6. Such a pure and luscious pink color! Eliza

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  7. Such a beautiful rose, I like that it is highlighted on the arbor. And that it thrives in partial sun, even better!

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    1. Agreed. And I'll continue to train it over the top and down the other side. I might plant an offshoot on the other side so it will completely cover the arbor. :)

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  8. Hi, we are two peas in a pod.... we planted a climbing rose this April. It is adjusting really well. I was not really into roses, but last year I got the rose bug. :-) I now have three different roses in our gardens. This will be my first climbing.
    Carla

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    1. Fun! I've always loved Roses, but I've been surprised with how many of them grow well in this mostly partial-shade garden. Enjoy your additions! :)

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  9. Lovely rose, Beth, and a good looking arbour! The fisherman definitely has a creative talent. Your rose is happily travelling across it.

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    1. Thanks, Catherine. Yes, he's a talented guy. It will be fun to follow this vine in the months and years ahead. :)

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  10. I love single roses. This is a beauty. And of course, your photos ars always fabulous.

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    1. Hi Chloris: Thanks for your kind words. I knew I would like this Rose, and I enjoy most Roses, but this one has exceeded my expectations. :)

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  11. A rose that can thrive in partial shade and is a beautiful shade of pink is a keeper.
    Jeannie@GetMeToTheCountry

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    1. Yes, I agree. :) And the form of the bloom and the climbing quality add to its charm.

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  12. So nice to see a "nearly native" rose :) I have one in the front yard, it's sooo hardy! (drought is the issue here)

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    1. Oh, you have this one, too? Nice! I suppose you have more drought years/times than we do, but the past two years were pretty bad here and it made it through. It's really enjoying this wet spring/summer, though.

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  13. A good climbing rose, especially a (nearly) native one, is a wonderful find. I am glad you found it. It's a beauty.

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    1. I do enjoy it, Jerry. The fruits are forming now. I wonder if I'll have more blooms before the summer is out? We'll see...

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