April 22, 2022

Blooms, Buds, and Beginnings

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Spring is really happening now. I was starting to wonder...

snowdrops 1

Because of the cool/cold weather we've had in April, some plants that were starting to bloom a month ago are still blooming. I think this is the longest the Snowdrops (Galanthus nivalis) have lasted. I believe this is 'Flore Pleno.'

snowdrops 2

The plant label for these Snowdrops is long gone, so I don't know their cultivar, but they are cuties.

tommies & aconites

The Tommies (Crocus Tommasinianus) and the Winter Aconites (Eranthis hyemalis) are still blooming, too.

tommies

They're so hopeful and hardy.

rhubarb

The Rhubarb (Rheum × hybridum) is making more progress.

And now it's time to celebrate many new garden happenings.

tete-a-tete

daffodil 1

daffodil 2

Daffodils (Narcissus spp.)!

crocus 2

crocus 1

Crocuses (Crocus vernus)!

hellebore 1

hellebore 2

hellebore 3

Hellebores (Helleborus orientalis)!

blue squill

Siberian Squill (Scilla Siberica)!

bleeding heart

Other plants will be filling in and blooming very soon, including Blooming Heart (Dicentra spectabilis).

hyacinth

Hyacinth (Hyacinthus orientalis). (It's a tiny one.)

mayapples

The Mayapples (Podophyllum peltatum) have emerged.

allium

The Alliums (A. giganteum) are budding. (This is either 'Globemaster' or 'Ambassador'; they're interplanted in this spot and I'll know when it blooms.) 

forsythia

The Forsythias (unknown dwarf hybrid) will be blooming this weekend.

bluebells

Along with the Virginia Bluebells (Mertensia virginica), which seem to have appeared out of nowhere. I've expanded the caging after this photo was taken; rabbits like to eat them.

Yay! Spring has sprung!

20 comments:

  1. Such lovely bulb flowers, and of course hooray for Hellebores.

    Happy Springtime!!

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    1. Yes, it's always a good day when the Hellebores are blooming. Happy spring!

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  2. It's wonderful to see such a display of bulb blooms when mine are mostly gone. I so wish I could grow masses of Crocus.

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    1. I wish I could grow more Crocuses, too. The rabbits tend to eat them, so I'm glad when quite a few of them survive to bloom time. The Daffodils are just starting, and then the Tulips will bloom (I have to surround them with Daffodils so the rabbits won't eat them). When the Daffodils (and a few Tulips) are in bloom, it will be very colorful. :)

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  3. Such a wonderful tour, really enjoyed it! :) We are way behind you, but normal for us. My native townsendias are in full bloom! Not spectacular but very welcome. Rhubarb is just starting to peek through the surface.

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    1. Happy spring, Hollis! Usually the Hellebores bloom in March, and sometimes some of the Daffodils and Crocuses start then, too. Townsendias are beautiful! I don't know if any are native here, but lots of people grow them in rock gardens. It's always exciting when the Rhubarb takes off...almost time for pie!

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  4. Beautiful!
    Have a wonderful weekend!

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    1. Thanks for stopping by, Lea! Spring (even when it's chilly) is a special time of year, isn't it?

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  5. Good to see spring is finally happening in your part of the world! You may only just have Forsythia coming out (ours is all but over), but your rhibarb is bigger than mine! Looking forward to rhubarb crumble…. 😃

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    1. Yes, I can't wait to make a rhubarb dessert of some sort. Yummy stuff! One good thing about the cooler weather is that the blooms last a little longer.

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  6. BEAUTIFUL.. I just love the close up photos. The pollen dust on the purple makes me smile.
    Thank you for sharing Beth!

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    1. Thank you, Carla. The little details of any plant are so fascinating. :)

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  7. So beautiful. What a fantastic collection of plants.
    The only plant that's a bit behind ours in Wiltshire is the bleeding heart, which has been flowering for a few weeks now.

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    1. Thanks, Tim. It's fascinating to see the changes every day in the springtime. Bleeding heart is a happy plant in my shady garden. :)

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  8. So much exploded over the weekend that now I'm concerned about two nights of frost. Your plants look good given our endless ups and downs.

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    1. Yes, the colder temps after the warmth were tough. I'm surprised that the plants can survive the dramatic ups and downs.

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  9. Wonderful to see bright spring colours against a vivid blue sky.

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    1. Yes, the bright blue skies are encouraging. We are cool this spring, but the colors are vibrant!

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  10. Beth, Thanks for the posting of what is happening here in the Madison area. I will say in the area of the Gardens at Waters East - not much yet. Really, only a couple of hundred miles from here but like a month behind. Can not wait much longer for the Spring to pop!

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    1. It seems gardens along Lake Michigan are behind us in the springtime, and their growing season lasts longer in the fall because of the lake effects.

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