January 22, 2021

Let's Overwinter Some Fuchsias!

fuchsia 1

Do you grow Fuchsias in your garden? They've been a mainstay in my garden for oh, so many years--particularly at our current location where we've lived for more than 20 years. Fuchsias like shade, and we certainly have plenty of that with our huge, old Oaks.

fuchsia collage

I've tried so many varieties of Fuchsias over the years and I've loved all of them, but there are two that are so special, I've taken to overwintering and dividing them for the next growing season. Fuchsias overwinter well in a bright, heated room with indirect light. I simply lightly water them a couple of times a week. To expand the collection, I clip the vines about halfway, and either root them in water first or simply place them in soil and water liberally for the first couple of weeks.

The two I personally enjoy the most are Fuchsia 'Autumnale' and Fuchsia 'Marinka.'

autumnale 1

Autumnale has the most exquisite variegated foliage that changes with the seasons and the light. Yes, it's beautiful and appropriate in the fall, but it's fabulous year round. This is a new variety for me, as I bought it last summer for my mom, so I'll always think of her with this one. When she passed, I took cuttings from her pots to bring home. It was lovely through the autumn, planted with ornamental kale.

autumnale 2

I'm finding that it's performing quite well in pots in the sunroom this winter and multiplying from cuttings. I should have plenty for new outdoor potted arrangements come May. Autumnale's flowers are similar to those of Marinka, shown below.

marinka 1

Yes, Markina is a long-time favorite! Such a hummingbird magnet, the flowers are lush and lovely, and the berries are large and juicy. (Did you know that Fuchsia berries are edible? They're delicious popped on top of a salad, or mixed with other berries!) 

marinka 2

Here's Marinka in the sunroom, with ripening berries and healthy vines. With summer sun, the plants will bloom profusely again very soon.

If you like Fuchsias, consider overwintering a few for fun and to save some money for next year's garden!

31 comments:

  1. I used to grow fuchsias. When I first started gardening I fell in love with one that had a dark pink base and a ruffled purple skirt similar to the one in your second picture. Now days I can't seem to find them in any of the nurseries around here. I had no idea that they made berries or that they are edible.
    My only bloom this winter is a single flower on an orchid. It isn't even that pretty. I think my orchids need to be repotted. A couple more of them have buds but they just don't want to open for some reason.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think that purple/pink one you're mentioning is 'Dollar Princess,' which I love, too. But I've had such success with 'Marinka' and the hummingbirds love it, so I continue to overwinter it and propagate it. I've had trouble finding 'Marinka' in the garden centers in recent years--another reason to keep it going inside during the winter. My orchid plant is still hanging in there, although I think the blooms that started in July/August are beginning to fade. I'll be curious to see if the plant will rebloom next year. I've never had success with orchids in the past. Fingers crossed.

      Delete
    2. I bet your orchid will rebloom. I think some people just don't give them a chance. Sometimes I have to be patient. Not an easy thing for me. ;)

      Delete
  2. I love fuchsias. I'm glad you've had success over-wintering them. I grew a lot of them in my former tiny shade garden with little trouble but I haven't had much success with them in my current garden. I've a few in my shade house but even those have struggled, although I've managed to keep an 'Autumnale' alive, albeit in a flowerless state.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Isn't 'Autumnale' wonderful?! It had a few blooms at Mom's place, but I'm hoping I'll get more this summer. In any case, the foliage is awesome enough to grow it just for that reason. 'Marinka' is a prolific bloomer, and the hummingbirds love it.

      Delete
  3. Those lovely leaves are definitely worth encouraging.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, I've been very pleased with the 'Autumnale' foliage. I think it's been around for a few years, but I'm glad I finally added it to the collection.

      Delete
  4. I do not know much about fuschias, but love that second one with the deep purple. And I always think that I am going to kill them once the cold arrives, but I may have to give it a try overwintering it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They are great shade plants, especially in hanging pots. And the hummingbirds love them. I've found them to be pretty easy to overwinter because they can take cool temperatures. Although they really thrive in heat and humidity.

      Delete
  5. Lovely. I would try it if we weren't death on indoor plants.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I find indoor plants to be much trickier than outdoors, for so many reasons--light, cats, dry air, scale insects...the list goes on and on. Until I had a sunroom, I didn't have much luck with them myself.

      Delete
  6. Beautiful, Beth! You make it sound easy. I've never kept one alive, but probably was allowing it too much sun. It must have been a hard time losing your mom this year. Warms my heart that you took cuttings from her plants to carry on. I have lots of memory plants and it's always a special treat when they bloom. Have a great week.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Susie. Yes, I remember Mom and odd times now and then. The happy memories help. I agree: memory plants are a good thing. Fuchsias are special for so many reasons. :)

      Delete
  7. I have never owned a fuchsia. When they occasionally appear at the nurseries in the spring, I linger around them enjoying their vibrant colors. Price shock runs me away.

    You are doing what I can't - keep something alive during the winter. Well, at least I was able to enjoy yours. Thanks for sharing.

    I am sorry about you losing your mother. I have an iris which grew at my grandmother's. I think of her whenever it blooms.

    Jeannie@GetMeToTheCountry

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Memory plants are special. Re: the cost of Fuchsias...I usually buy medium-size plants and they fill the pots fast. They haven't been too expensive here, but overwintering helps the budget. :)

      Delete
  8. You surprised me! I did not think of Wisconsin as Fuchsia-friendly. Now I know better, thank you. That 'Autumnale': oh, my! Wonderful. 'Marinka' is a classic.

    In my childhood everyone in the neighborhood was growing Fuchsias. Mom & Dad, thrifty immigrants, filled the backyard with them because they were free, gifts from the neighbors. Many memories.

    I have just two, the same two, re-propagated every couple of years. Our summers are so hot and dry now, water so expensive, Fuchsias have gotten difficult.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Our summers are warm (many days are hot) and humid. Our weather here in the southern part of the state isn't all that different from Chicago's weather. So, we get four, diverse seasons. The Fuchsias like our summers, and they survive the late springs and early autumns. I simply bring in the ones I want to keep before the first frost. Your memories of Fuchsias lining the backyards is really special!

      Delete
  9. Hi Beth,
    My husband is a huge fan of fuchsia. We had such a lovely fuchsia a few years ago. I did not even think of trying to overwinter it. Thank you for the tips.
    Carla

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hey Carla: I've found them to be pretty easy to overwinter and propagate. Good luck if you try it. :)

      Delete
  10. Fuchsias are stunning, but here in hot Austin, they're really only for container plants-- and in the cooler seasons. By June, it's too warm. I enjoyed reading your tips, though.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tina: I only grow them in pots, myself. I like to have them hanging so I can see the dangling flowers, and that makes it easier for the hummingbirds to access them. Sorry to hear the Austin summers are too hot for them, but I'm not all that surprised. Even here, when we have a heat wave in the summer I have to water them almost daily. I'll bet they'd love your springs and autumns, though.

      Delete
  11. I adore Fuchsias! They are a good spring container plant for me but hard to find. They either sell out quickly or are not sold by local nurseries. I think it is great that you can over winter yours. I tried that one year but was not successful. I may have overwatered it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's so interesting: Fuchsias don't seem too difficult to find here; as annuals to plant in May. I really enjoy them in hanging baskets.

      Delete
  12. Beautiful! And I really miss my Fuchsia at the past.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I imagine they love your climate year-round, Endah! They are pretty happy here (especially in the dappled shade) from May through the first frost in mid-October.

      Delete
  13. Thanks for this cheerful post! I have fond memories of fuchsias and hummingbirds in our yard in California, long ago. I think my parents probably just watered them. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, yes, I imagine they love the California climate year-round, too, as long as they have enough water. That's why I like to plant them in hanging pots near the house--so I can easily water them. Lovely plants.

      Delete
  14. I like Fuchsias but it never occurred to me that they might have different foliage types as well as flowers. That is a beauty and a lovely way to keep memories of your mom with you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Linda. Fuchsias seem to like the conditions here from May through mid-October. I'm so glad.

      Delete
  15. Why didn't I grow fuschsias last year? I don't know - but you inspire me to put them on my spring list. And then maybe I'll try overwintering some. Lovely post. P.x

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Pam. Fuchsias are such graceful plants, and the fact that they attract hummingbirds makes them even more special.

      Delete

Thanks for stopping by!

Your comment might not appear right away (even though we love you). PlantPostings uses comment moderation, and we read every comment before we publish.

ANONYMOUS VISITORS: Security updates mean your comments likely will NOT be published. Sorry. Also, comments with hyperlinks might not make it through the heightened security system.

Have a great gardening day!