April 20, 2016

Wordless Early Ephemerals

enemion
Enemion biternatum

red trillium
Trillium erectum

mayapple1
Podophyllum peltatum

mayapple2
Podophyllum peltatum

jack
Arisaema triphyllum

wild ginger
Asarum canadense

bloodroot1
Sanguinaria canadensis

bloodroot2
Sanguinaria canadensis

44 comments:

  1. The ephemeral plants are just starting to bloom here, bloodroot the first I have seen. My friend and I are going out in the gorge on the hunt after I get home from Seattle. In Canada, they have a special area we will be exploring.

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    1. They just started for us a few days ago, but everything is happening much too fast now! The only one I haven't seen yet (that I know about in my woodland) is Trillium grandiflorum. But I wouldn't be surprised if it started emerging today. This is so early for us! Enjoy your hunt!!

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  2. Wow, look at all those Mayapples! I can just imagine a box turtle wandering through the buffet.

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    1. Yes, we have quite a colony of Mayapples on our property here. This is so early for them to be at this stage! Usually they unfold in early May, hence, most years the name fits perfectly. Yes, your box turtle would be very happy here! I wouldn't be surprised to see turtles out in the patch. I haven't, but there's quite a bit of leaf litter. I know something usually gets the fruit before it has a chance to ripen. :)

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  3. (Sorry if this was duplicate). You must be thrilled with this early spring display. I am partial to the Sanguinaria canadensis.

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    1. Thanks for your persistence--no duplicate. :) It's always thrilling to see the ephemerals, but they are so, so early for us this year. Most years, these plants would be emerging and blooming in early May! I couldn't have said it better regarding the Sanguinaria. Something about it (perhaps the fact that the blooms only last a couple of days) makes my heart sing.

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  4. Love the little parasols of Podophyllum peltatum. I've never seen it growing in the wild before. The Sanguinaria is gorgeous too.

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    1. Yes, the Mayapples are fun to watch over time, for sure! At first they look like little spikes coming out of the earth, then the tips of the buds pop up, with the surrounding foliage--looking like closed umbrellas. Finally, the umbrellas open and the entire hill is covered with Mayapples. The Sanguinaria is stunning, but its display is so, so short-lived.

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  5. You know spring is on her way when you see these beauties popping up.

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    1. Absolutely! Unfortunately, many of these guys have such a short time to display their beauty. Of course, that's why they're ephemerals and why they're so special. I feel kind of sad once the show is over.

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  6. Saw a few spring ephemerals last weekend at the Arboretum: Bloodroot, rue anemone, pasqueflowers and toothwort. The trout lilies were budding, but not yet in bloom -- maybe this weekend -- and the mayapple leaves were scarce and not very tall. Oh, bluebells were also just starting to bloom. Best of show right now are the magnolia trees at Longenecker (see today's post). So happy we're finally seeing warmer weather!

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    1. To illustrate how quickly things are happening, I was at the Arb yesterday and the Magnolias are past peak already. The Trout Lilies are in full bloom, the Mayapples are flattening out (like mine), the Bluebells are blooming, and some of the Trilliums are starting. Today or tomorrow would be a very good time to catch the show at the Arb before it's over!

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    2. I was there again on Apr 22, and while some magnolia were past their prime, others were starting to bloom. A few lilacs were also starting to bloom, as well as Russian almond, quince, and rhododendrons. I saw a lot of toothwort, trout lilies, very few rue anemone, bluebells, a few bitterroot left on the Wingra trail and a lot of marsh marigold over there -- no trillium. Hoping maybe I can get back this weekend (8th).

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  7. How lovely...a welcome sign that winter is done! And loving the scattering of Podophyllum Peltatumthey - they look like little umbrellas :)

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    1. Yes, winter is done! Hurrah! The Mayapples are in full swing now, as are many of our other spring ephemerals. I'm actually a little glad it will be cool for a few days because the flowers will last a little longer. :)

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  8. No words necessary. These beauties speak their own language, and it's universal.

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    1. Sometimes a Wordless Wednesday simply makes sense--in this case, the ephemerals are blooming so early. Almost in the blink of an eye, they'll be done. :(

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    1. I agree, Diana. :) The Trilliums aren't quite blooming yet, so I have that to look forward to.

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    1. It's certainly glorious! It was happening so fast, though. I'm secretly a little pleased that the temps will cool in the days ahead so the ephemerals will last a little longer.

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  11. Such wonderful wildflowers. I love how the Mayapples emerge like little green umbrellas.

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    1. The Mayapples are fun. They emerged and opened up so fast and early this year, but they're always a joy to see.

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  12. Replies
    1. Thank you, Endah. It's fun to compare and learn about each other's gardens, isn't it?

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  13. Such an exciting time of year when things happen so very quickly! While long and lazy summer days soaking in the beauty of our gardens are wonderful, the joyful exuberance of spring just can't be beat. You've captured it beautifully in your images.1

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    1. Thanks, Peter. :) "Joyful exuberance" is such a great way to describe it. I don't think I was quite ready for the full force of spring this year, but now that it's here, I wish it would last a little longer.

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  14. Isn't it a wonderful time of the year. Your pictures are lovely. I don't think we have Enemion biternatum around here. It is beautiful.

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    1. Yes, an amazing time of year! Thanks, Alain. The Enemion looks so much like the Rue Anemone, but the leaves are different. It is a pretty plant. :)

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  15. Beautiful photos of nature waking up! It's a time of great expectations......everyday brings something new out of the earth.

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    1. Thanks! I noticed we have many of the same things blooming in our gardens. Happy spring!

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  16. Your post reminds me of when we lived in western Pennsylvania. We used to visit a park that had large swaths of Mayapple, as well as white trillium and many stands of Virginia bluebells.

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    1. That sounds like a great park! This is a great time of year to view the Virginia Bluebells. I just added them to my garden a couple of years ago, from seed. Hopefully, they'll bloom next year. :)

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  17. Great shot of the mayapple army on the march! :)

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    1. Thanks, Aaron. Ha! That's kinda what they look like, don't they? They cover the northwest side of the hill.

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  18. It's lovely to see plants growing in Spring were ever they are, like the photo of the Podophyllum peltatum.
    Amanda xx

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    1. Hi Amanda: The woodland here is pretty wild. It's fun to hunt for wildflowers in there. :)

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    1. Thanks, Cassi. Your garden is gorgeous, too. :)

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  20. I love these! My early spring ephemerals are gone till next year. It's nice to see yours!

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    1. This is early for us! I'm secretly a little glad that we have some cool weather in the forecast, so the ephemerals will last a little longer. :)

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  21. Lovely! I haven't seen any sign of my Bloodroot in my garden this year, which makes me sad:(

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  22. That is quite a woodland full of mayapples! I do love them for their big, shiny leaves and fall apples. Fun.

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  23. Fabulous shots of the best wildflowers that start our spring blooming.

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