July 28, 2015

The Roses of Olbrich Botanical Gardens

hybrid tea rose

I'd been meaning to get over to Madison's Olbrich Botanical Gardens for weeks. I enjoy viewing and photographing roses, even if I don't have many myself.

I finally made time for a visit last week, and while I often think of June as the best month for viewing roses, there were plenty of midsummer and ever-blooming beauties to enjoy.

rugosa with buds & hips

I couldn't find the marker for this Rugosa, but it offered the full spectrum of interest--giant hips, blooms, buds, and gorgeous chartreuse foliage. It might be 'Charles Albenel,' shown later in this post.

'william baffin' kordesii rose

This 'William Baffin' Kordesii rose seemed the epitome of the old-fashioned romantic rose--rich, gentle pink color, with petals gently draped around the stamens and the stigma.

'radrazz' knockout floribunda

This Knockout Floribunda, 'RADrazz,' also had a pretty color, and seemed a prolific bloomer.

'polar joy' shrub rose 1

One of my favorites was this 'Polar Joy' tree rose. It was very tall--perhaps seven feet? I had to photograph up toward some of the blooms.

'polar joy' shrub rose 2

A lower branch with shadier conditions revealed the unique soft, rose-pink color of 'Polar Joy's' buds and flowers. This one is marketed as the "only truly hardy tree rose" by several vendors--hardy to zone 4.

'sea foam' shrub rose

'Sea Foam' shrub rose is certainly true to its name. It looked soft enough to dissolve in the hand.

pink knockout 'radcon' shrub rose

'RADcon,' was a lovely pink Knock Out shrub rose, which apparently tolerates part shade (note to self).

'lady elsie may' shrub rose

The color of 'Lady Elsie May,' also a shrub rose, caught my eye. With varied light and depending on the age of the bloom, it looked coral/pink to warm red.

'jens munk' rugosa

More romance and color eye candy here, with 'Jens Munk,' a Rugosa rose. Swoon.

'grootendorst supreme' rugosa

'Grootendorst Supreme,' another Rugosa, had prolific clusters of small blooms and buds.

'blanc double de coubert' rugosa

The pollinators enjoyed 'Blanc Double de Coubert' Rugosa.

'yankee lady' rugosa

'Yankee Lady' Rugosa was much more stunning than the bright, sunlit image here, but you get the idea.

fire meidiland 'meipsidue' shrub rose

It was the form of 'MEIpsidue,' a Fire Meidiland Shrub Rose, that was alluring to me--resembling dramatic, draping flamenco skirts.

'charles albanel' rugosa

Obviously, the Rugosas were in their glory, including 'Charles Albenel.'

'carefree spirit' shrub rose

One of the most unique roses blooming in mid-July was 'Carefree Spirit,' an All-American Rose Selection.

'captain samuel holland' shrub or climbing

'Captain Samuel Holland' was truly dreamy, with full layers of petals and gorgeous buds draping over fencing. This rose is marketed as both a shrub and and a climbing rose.

'fru dagmar hastrup' rugosa

And of course I was enchanted over this 'Fru Dagmar Hastrup' Rugosa.

There were many more, and quite a few had lovely scents. The bees were particularly enamored of the Rugosas. I captured several of them in a short, minute-long wrap-up video. Enjoy!



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51 comments:

  1. Oh my gosh, that first opening white rose is like a delicate Japanese geisha. I can almost feel the texture of those petals. Really stunning capture. You have me at that first picture!

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    1. Isn't that one dreamy?! It has a touch of dusty pink/peach to its petals, which makes my heart leap. ;-) Unfortunately, I couldn't find or didn't capture the name of that one. So, I cheated and used it as my opening image.

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  2. Lovely photos and amazing how many beautiful roses are still blooming in July.

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    1. Hi Chloris: Thank you. Yes, I thought there might be a few still going, but I was surprised with how many will still blooming and going strong. To see some with hips, buds, and flowers was wonderful. :)

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  3. Beautiful roses, especially the single petal roses! Looks so simple but so pretty! Thanks for sharing!

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    1. You're welcome, Endah. The singles are growing on me now--especially after I saw how much the bees enjoy them!

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    2. I used to have a Mermaid climber. Single, soft yellow perfection. But too exuberant in a small garden, sadly.

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  4. How lovely! I, too, don't have many roses in my garden, but I love seeing them and photographing them. That 'Captain Samuel Holland' is a gorgeous color. What a great place to visit!

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    1. Yes, Olbrich is a treasure in the city. Many years, we've visited in June to see the roses. They've changed things around a few times, but the place just keeps getting better. Great place to visit, from April through October (or the winter, if you like winter gardens).

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  5. Dear Beth, gosh, the rugosas do so well in your neck of the woods! I love them for their crinkly flower petals, their coarse bright foliage and, of course, their fragrance, which can be quite strong and enchanting in some varieties.
    I enjoyed seeing your bee video. The bees seemed to be extra busy that day!
    Warm regards,
    Christina

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    1. Yes, I guess the Rugosas like it here. We had some straggly ones on the side of the house when we moved in here. Frankly, they were a tangled, diseased mess. So, we took them out, and that's where I have my veggie/cut flower garden now. It's the only patch of strong sun on the lot. But after seeing how much the bumbles like the single Rugosas, I think I might have to add some--to this garden or a future garden!

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  6. Lovely photos of the roses, especially the first photo, wish we could smell them too...
    Amanda xx

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    1. Thank you, Amanda. I really should have taken notes on the scents of the roses, but I was taking a leisurely stroll and simply admired and photographed as I was going along. The best rose scent I've ever experienced, however, is a rose that I have here--one that my great-grandfather grafted and propagated. It's unbelievably delicious!

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  7. They certainly are photogenic...and easy on the nose, but also deer candy. You got some wonderful photos from your visit.

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    1. Thanks, Ricki. I'm happy that I don't have deer here. My roses don't seem to be bothered by the rabbits, but they're in places surrounded by other plants. Yes, roses are pleasurable for all the senses--even hearing, when covered with bumbles!

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  8. Beautiful photos, Beth. It must be a lovely place to visit. I need to see Madison, I think.

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    1. Thanks! Yes, you must visit. Let me know when you're in town and we can tour some gardens together. :)

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  9. that is one very happy bumblebee. And it is wonderful to see so many different kinds of roses. I agree with you, Beth, Jens Munk is definitely swoonful.

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    1. Oh, I know. That Jens Munk was lovely. The bumbles were so very happy that day. Although I do believe they're happy every day at Olbrich. :)

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  10. Replies
    1. Thank you, Tatyana. I know you have some lovely roses in your garden, too. Every garden needs at least one rose, I think. If I ever have a sunny garden again, I will have more.

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  11. Many beautiful rose varieties. I would like to see the rose beds though to see all the roses in their entirety. From a design perspective, it is more interesting for me.

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    1. Ah, a good point, Donna! You will have to wait for my next post about Olbrich. This post was created as an "up close and personal" view of individual rose cultivars. Perhaps the landscape shots in the next Olbrich post will be more interesting to you. I took many photos that day. The roses at the gardens are more integrated into the landscapes than they used to be.

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  12. How beautiful. I don't know much about them, but can appreciate the beauty. I am going to go check out the mosquito repellant..... I can't use DEET... Michelle

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    1. I don't use chemicals, including systemics, in my garden. And it can be hard to grow roses without them. I know there are some organic methods, but then I have the shade. So ... I enjoy roses grown elsewhere. Maybe when I have a sunny garden again someday. Re: the Thermacell unit -- it really works!

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  13. Just gorgeous. I was just mentioning to someone else that roses with just a blush of colour are my absolute favourite, as in the first photo. And I also have this thing for peach coloured roses too.

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    1. I would have to agree, Margaret. For me, it's like that slight hint of color makes them more alluring and magical. Peachy/pink and light blush pink roses are my favorites. I could stare at them for hours, like a fine piece of artwork.

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  14. So beautiful! And such a treat since the few roses I have are not doing well at all this year. Loved the busy bee video! I

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    1. Thanks, Rose. For some reason, some of my roses didn't even bloom this year. I think they didn't get enough sun. Some did, though, so I'm enjoying what I can get. The ones at the botanical garden were stunning.

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  15. Beautiful roses! Rugosas are some of my favorites as they never get diseases, are so fragrant, and produce beautiful hips. The bees obviously like them too. Thanks for the fun video!

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    1. I like Rugosas, too. Well, I like most roses ... if someone else takes care of them. ;-) You are most welcome.

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  16. I miss the Olbrich garden! It's funny I don't remember the roses, though - possibly I never went at the right time. Those Rugosas are wonderful, especially the white ones.

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    1. Hi Jason: They used to have a formal rose garden, with all the roses lined up in rings around a central area. But in 2005, they opened the new rose garden, which is interplanted with other perennials and shrubs. It's a unique display and highlights Midwest-hardy roses.

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  17. Oh Beth, I absolutely love roses so I knew I would find some treasures here and I was right, the first rose is gorgeous but they are all lovely really! Loved your video too, isn’t it amazing how busy those bumblebees are, quite dazzling to watch them :-)

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    1. Hi Helene: I'm glad you enjoyed it. I love roses, too. I'd have more, but I need more sun and more time for upkeep. I do love to visit roses at botanical gardens, though. Yes, the bumbles are so fun to watch!

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  18. What a sheer delight the visit must have been Beth. You must have been so pleased so many were in bloom. I lost count how many times I scrolled up and down.

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    1. Hi Angie: I'm glad you enjoyed it, too. Yes, I was kind of surprised that so many were still blooming so profusely in July. And it was extra fun to see the ones with full blooms, buds, and hips. :)

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  19. So many roses!! Japanese beetle are after mine but they still bloom as much as they can. I have to admire their determination. :o)

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    1. Yes, I have some Japanese Beetle issues, too. This year, they seem to be going more for the Cosmos blooms for some reason. They don't seem to bother my roses, but my roses are in dappled shade, so they don't bloom as much as they would in the sun. But I guess that helps keep the Japanese Beetles at bay, too.

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  20. This is one time I really wish that blogs had smell a vision....the scent there must be stunningly gorgeous.

    And although all of your roses are beautiful, something about the rose hips makes my heart sing too....

    Jen

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    1. Oh, I know. Wouldn't smell-a-vision be amazing with gardening blogs? I guess if we can imagine it, it will probably happen someday... I have a thing for rose hips, too. They seem the ultimate symbol of health and fertility. I've never tried rose hip tea, but I hear it's tasty and healthy. :)

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  21. You had me with that first photo. Loved the 'Carefree Spirit,' too. Have not been to Olbrich yet this summer, maybe soon... ☺

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    1. Just catching up on comments from some previous posts. Yes! Olbrich is a great place to be during the summer. Or the fall, or the spring. Not crazy about most Wisconsin destinations during the winter, but skiing and hiking are OK on a milder day. Do you feel fall in the air? It seems early this year.

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  22. Oh these are gorgeous. I am a big fan of the rugosa roses.

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    1. I enjoy the Rugosas, too. More than I did when I was younger. I'm not sure why.

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  23. Gorgeous. I miss the Olbrich gardens. Living in Madison for four years while going to UW, I wish I would have made it out there more often...but the fact that I didn't have a car half the time, and then was normally too busy studying didn't give me much freetime. The couple of times I did make it out there though, I thought it was absolutely wonderful and serene. Seems like I should have gone out there more often for study breaks when things got a bit too stressful! Being in the garden definitely helps melt the stress away, put things in perspective, appreciate life, and give me focus, and Olbrich was a great place to do just that.

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    1. Hi Rebecca: Oh, you're a Badger alum! My son went to school there, too. I'm a Drake U (Des Moines, IA) alum, but I worked on campus for several years. Yes, it's hard to explore much when you don't have a car. And yes, gardens definitely help to melt away the stress. :)

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  24. I can see why you wanted to visit these beautiful roses.....and the bees agree with you!

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    1. Yes, the roses were lovely. Sad to think the summer is almost over. But Olbrich is a wonderful place to be during the autumn, too.

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  25. What a beautiful display of roses!

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    1. They are gorgeous. If you ever visit the Midwest, we aren't far from Chicago. :)

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