April 17, 2015

Inspiration Among the Magnolias

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I stopped over at the University of Wisconsin–Madison Arboretum the other day to see the Magnolias in bloom. The 75 Magnolia varieties are on display in the Longenecker Gardens, near the visitor center. Bloom time varies from year to year, but I was surprised at how many are blooming synchronously this year. It's really quite spectacular.

Here are a few highlights in no particular order:

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If you miss the show this year, there's always next year. Or, you can plan to visit when the 175 varieties of Crabapples are blooming in a couple of weeks.

64 comments:

  1. they are wonderful flowers. So spring-y. I wonder whose nest it is. It's very exposed, not cosy at all.

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    1. I was wondering the same thing about the nest. It seems like a precarious perch, but I suppose it's more secure than it looks. :)

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  2. They do look wonderful, and it must be nice to see them all flowering.
    Amanda xx

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    1. Hi Amanda: Yes, The arboretum has an impressive collection, and it's wonderful to catch the Magnolias at this stage--with many blooming and just about to bloom.

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  3. Beautiful. We moved into our house around Valentine's Day and we are in Michigan... so I am waiting to see what we have in our yard. My neighbor has these in their yard and only a few feet away from our house. It just started opening and I am excited to see them emerge. They look with they will be white. :-)

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    1. How fortunate to have a neighbor with a Magnolia...and close to your house! I don't have a Magnolia tree so I have Magnolia-envy. ;-)

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  4. Beautiful blooms and such fantastic photos!

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    1. Thank you, Chloris. There's something magical about Magnolias blooming--at all stages of their unfurling.

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  5. Truly fabulous. As are your pictures.

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    1. Thank you, Jessica. Yes, the Magnolias are truly fabulous.

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  6. I love this time of year when the Magnolias are blooming. Very beautiful pics, Beth.

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    1. Thank you, Donna. I could spend hours among the Magnolias. Especially with the afternoon (or morning) light hitting them at interesting angles.

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  7. You're making me miss the UW Arboretum! I don't have any Magnolias in my garden now (one died on me), but my favorite are the Star Magnolias.

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    1. Come back and visit! I don't have any Magnolias in my garden either, so I have Magnolia-envy of anyone who does. ;-) But I guess I can enjoy them at the Arb or at Olbrich, (or covet the neighbors' trees). I honestly like them all!

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  8. Magnolias are beautiful and a joy to look at the whole tree in flowers. Regards.

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    1. Yes, absolutely! They're beautiful in all stages--from fuzzy buds to full bloom to shapely foliage-filled tree.

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  9. What a visual feast! Your photos have made my morning exceptionally sweet. It must have been fantastic to see these in person. I will dream of the crabapples!

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    1. Thanks, Deb. I'm glad you enjoyed the short tour. Yes, the Arboretum is a fabulous resource in our community--from the horticultural garden to the native plant garden to the prairies and woodlands. :)

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  10. Looks like mainly star magnolias? Or am I mistaken...?

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    1. Hi Aaron: I admit the light seemed to be hitting the Star Magnolias especially well while I was there. Most of the trees are hybrids, some haven't bloomed yet. Included in the collection are some of the 'Little Girl' hybrids and the rare yellow-flowered hybrids that have Cucumbertree Magnolia as one of the parents.

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  11. Magnolias so beautiful and so many different ones. You pictures are gorgeous!

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    1. Thank you. Yes, Magnolias are stunning. I find it fascinating to capture them in various stages as the buds open.

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  12. Oh Beth these are gorgeous and what a wonder to also be able to see all those crabapples. Supposed to get cold this coming week...

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    1. The Crabapples will be amazing, too. I have several in my garden, though, while I [unfortunately] do not have any Magnolias (maybe someday). Yes, we will have some cold nights this week, so that will delay the Crabapples a bit. That is good--we will have a longer spring! :)

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  13. That is some collection of magnolias. I don't think I've seen so many in one place since moving away from the coast. We do grow them up here, but they tend to bloom now, right when it usually gets hot, and the flowers fade fast.

    But what a treat!

    Jen

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    1. Yes, sadly the Magnolia flowers tend to fade fast here, too. Although with the cooler temperatures this next week, we will probably have an extended show. Yay!

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  14. Such wonderful photos - and much needed as my stellata only graced us with a single flower this year! Luckily our cherry tree is flowering for the first time to make up for it!

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    1. Thanks, Tim. Oh...jealous of your Cherry tree! We had two when we moved in here, but sadly both died. We did not replace them as they opened up a little sunlight on the property. We do have several Crabapples, though, so as you say--they make up for it. Enjoy your Cherry blossoms!!

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  15. Wow! Shown of perfectly through your photography Beth. Thanks for taking the time in sharing with us - it truly is much appreciated.

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    1. Thank you, Angie. They are very photogenic. It's a pleasure to study and photograph Magnolias--in person and through the lens. :)

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  16. Oh my, this was a true treat. Amazing photography.
    Carla

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    1. Thanks, Carla. I'm glad you enjoyed the short tour. You're close enough to easily visit the collection, and the Crabapple collection, at the Arb. :)

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  17. I second Jessica: Beautiful plants and beautiful photos. Love those fuzzy buds

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    1. Thanks, Linda. The Arb is a treasure, isn't it?! I love the buds--in all stages--too.

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    1. Thank you, Aga. Thanks for stopping by!

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  19. What a wonderful post. I love seeing all the spring blooms... Michelle

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    1. Thank you, Michelle. Magnolias blooming seem so hopeful to me. It's always a highlight of the year. :)

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  20. That's a lot of flowering trees! Gorgeous! Magnolias have such beautiful flowers. I don't care for the large glossy leaves that so many of them have, but it's hard to top those amazing blooms!

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    1. I've always been a big fan of Magnolias, but I've never had one of my own. It's wonderful to be able to visit and admire them at arboretums and botanical gardens!

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  21. Wow - so beautiful. 4 years I spent living on the UW-Madison campus. I'm now kicking myself for not "stopping to smell the roses"...or magnolias while I was there.

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    1. Yes, I know--I miss opportunities too often, as well. Life happens. It makes the moments when we're in the right spot at the right time extra special. And of course, having the time to appreciate the moments plays a part, as well. My four years of college (in Iowa) sped by way too fast. ;-)

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  22. omg, these magnolia photos are crazy amazing. Excellent job! My 'Jane' magnolia gets chewed to the ground every winter by the rabbits ~ your photos may have just inspired me to protect it (finally!)

    on the Virginia bluebells, there were a couple blooms the 1st year but maybe because I started with the plant from Kathy ~ instead of from seed?? I hope you get a few this year. It's such a beautiful spring bloomer. I am loving it even more because it seems to be one thing the rabbits leave alone!!

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    1. Thanks, Kathleen. They're amazing, inspiring trees and blooms. Thanks for the info about the Bluebells. I'm noticing more plants, but I don't think they'll flower this year, either. Maybe next year. V. Bluebells are gorgeous, so I'm hoping ...

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  23. Beautiful photos, Beth -- I just hope your visit wasn't as windy as mine. Isn't Longenecker looking spectacular right now? I need to get back over there before end of the month. I'd also like to attend the wildflower walks the next two Sundays (one at Gallistel Woods, the next at Grady Tract) and see what's starting to come up.

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    1. Thanks, Heather. Yes, this seems to be the highlight time of year to walk through Longenecker. I hope the freezing nights coming up don't ruin the blooms. The Crabapples should be OK, though. Have fun on the Wildflower Walks! I have quite a few ephemeral wildflowers in my woodland garden, so this is the time of year that I really appreciate it. :)

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  24. Simply stunning! I love magnolias, when they are blooming they always bring a sense of joy of spring. Your images are great and I bet you had a fantastic time just walking around the arboretum. I'm already waiting for the magnolias flowering near summer, the Magnolia virginiana and Magnolia grandiflora).

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    1. Thanks, Lula. Yes, unfortunately I didn't have unlimited time so I couldn't savor it this time. I noticed many people, though, pausing to study and smell the blooms. The Arb also has some later-blooming Magnolias.

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  25. They are amazing! TY for sharing!

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    1. Thanks for coming along on the tour. :)

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  26. Gorgeous photos!! I love magnolias. :o)

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  27. I bet they smelled as lovely as they looked. Awesome photos!

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    1. Yes! I noticed that some of the visitors were spending most of their time taking in the scent. I spent most of my time snapping photos, but the sights and scents were fabulous.

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  28. What a gallery! I do love the magnolias.

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    1. It's a great collection. It's a shame to miss it. Next time, I think I'll leave my camera at home and just take it all in.

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  29. Stunning Magnolias! And as Gracie wrote, I bet their fragrance was heavenly. I'm just now getting home from travel, but I wanted to tell you how much I loved your photos of the oranges feeding the Orioles! At our friend's home in S.F. they had grape jelly out for the Orioles. Can you imagine! And they came down and tasted it quite often. I had never seen anything like it. thanks for your beautiful pics!

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    1. Thanks, Susie. Yes, the Magnolias looked and smelled heavenly! I have heard that the Orioles enjoy the grape jelly, too. I've never tried that, but I think I will this year. :) We've had a bit of a cold snap, but I think I'll put some out next week, or maybe when the first one comes to visit. I'm glad you had a great trip!

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  30. Gorgeous shots! Magnolias are a favorite of mine and if I lived on acreage, I'd have a grove of them!

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    1. Thanks! Yes, I think I might add them, too, in the same situation. At this point, though, I have too much shade. I'm not complaining (much), but I'm not in a position to add more trees. Love Magnolias, though!

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  31. What a visual treat! Your camera has selected the best of the best (of course you might have had something to do with that).

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    1. Thanks, Ricki. The light cooperated nicely. And the wind was just perky enough to add interest without making the shots too difficult. :) They are amazing blooms!

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  32. Replies
    1. Thanks, Sue. :) I was just over there again today, and some of the Magnolias are still blooming. Now the late-blooming ones are blooming, and the Crabapples and Lilacs are starting. Wow!

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