July 15, 2014

Nature's wild, wordless bouquets*

punctata meadow

club rush

jewel weed 2

bur reed

swamp thistle

water reeds

monarda fleabane

*All photos were taken at our "wild" property in Marquette County, Wis., where we've been spending a lot of time this summer.

Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day
Foliage Follow-Up
Wordless Wednesday

56 comments:

  1. Such amazing photos! I love how you've captured the beauty in your "natural" garden.

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    1. Thank you, Rebecca! I was walking around the property the other day and realized how incredible some of the natural combinations are. If we just pause to look and enjoy.

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    1. Thank you, Donna. Nature supplied the beauty. :)

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  3. Oh, dotted horsemint! I've been disappointed not to see any along the nearby bike path this year, but finally saw some at Grady Tract/Arboretum on Monday. I also have wildflower photos for this week: My WW

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    1. Yep. It's unique, isn't it? I could study it all day. When I first saw it, I didn't realize all the detail on the plant--really fascinating. I saw some at the Arb the other day, too. It definitely likes the sandy soil in Marquette County, as well!

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  4. Beautiful, we all need a good dose of the wild now and again.

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    1. True, true. My garden at home is a little wonky right now, so a post from the wild, natural property seemed appropriate for July's GBBD.

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  5. It is really wonderful when nature inspires us with plant combinations that work together "naturally". Beautiful!

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    1. Thanks, Karin. I was trying to think of a different approach to GBBD than simply walking around and taking photos at home. There are just so many things blooming! Then, when we were up at the cottage, I saw the meadow full of Dotted Horsemint and Daisy Fleabane, and thought, "Wow, there's a bouquet right there!"

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  6. Ah, I was going to say that you needed some words so I could figure out what all of those awesome plants were, but I realized if I hovered my mouse above the pictures it would tell me. That first pink plant is so pretty and unusual! I thought it might be in the Monarda family, but I've never seen a Monarda like that before - very striking!

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    1. Yes, good clue. ;-) The pineapple-shaped Monarda is Dotted Horsemint or Spotted Beebalm (M. punctata). It does indeed grow wild in the fields and meadows up at our cottage. It is quite an interesting plant. Seems very complex to me. I did a post about it a while back: http://bit.ly/1spowu0. The others are mainly plants along the shore of the lake. Some would be excellent pond plants. I believe they're all North American native plants.

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  7. Absolutely breath taking Beth...such a beautiful place to spend time, in nature at peace just being! Wishing you a blissful summer there.

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    1. Thanks, Donna. We've been up there most weekends so far this summer, and back home during the week. I like to be up there when the Black Cap Raspberries and the Mulberries ripen. It has become a yearly tradition. :)

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  8. What fun to have property to explore all the summer wild flowering things!
    I enjoyed . . .

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    1. Yes, I don't do much "gardening" up there, but I do get some ideas for wonderful native plant combinations. And bouquet ideas. :) Thanks, Lynne.

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  9. I just noticed on one of my walks . . . three different kinds of plumage on Milk Weed . . . guess I better grab the camera . . . and right now go!

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    1. Ah, I'll look forward to your post!!!

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  10. That is one beautiful post. Thank you.

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    1. Thank you! I thought the Fleabane/Monarda combination was a lovely, natural bouquet. I just happened to be at the right place at the right time. The water plants are fascinating too, but not quite as vibrant.

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  11. Beautiful photos Beth. I especially like the close-ups of the water droplets and Monardia...lovely!

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    1. Thank you, Lee. :) The Jewelweed (Impatiens capensis) is a relatively recent discovery for me. Whenever it rains, droplets gather on the foliage. It's also called "Touch Me Not" because when the seeds are ready and you touch the plant, the seeds scatter. :)

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  12. Nice! I recognize the horsemint, gray's sedge, and blazing star - except for the blazing star, I have never seen these growing in the wild.

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    1. Thanks! Yes, the purple plant is Dotted Horsemint. Nifty plant! Actually, the others are Bur Reed (the round pointy one) and Swamp Thistle (the fuzzy purple flowers). I can see why the latter looks like Rough Blazing Star, but the photo doesn't show all the poky parts. ;-)

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  13. Amazing plants and amazing photos. I don't even recognized some of these things!

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    1. Thanks, Sarah! The area where they were taken has very sandy soil, and the plants along the lake are marsh/swamp plants. Very few of these would grow well in my garden at home because the soil, sun, and other conditions are so different. But it's fun to see them up at the cottage.

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  14. the spectacular purple stars are Monarda?

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    1. Hi Diana: Yes, the first and last photo include M. Punctata (nicknames Dotted Horsemint or Spotted Beebalm). It reminds me of a Pineapple shape. I did a post about it last summer, too: http://bit.ly/1spowu0.

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  15. Simply beautiful! Must be a lovely place to spend.

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    1. Thank you! Yes, it's a great place to explore and find native plants. We try to pull the invasives, but otherwise we just let a great portion of it go natural. Lots of wildlife, great plants, and tons of native pollinators. :)

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  16. I love that that triple decker plant at the top!

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    1. Spotted Beebalm (Monarda punctata)! Me, too. It's actually quite fascinating close-up, too. Here's another post about it: http://bit.ly/1spowu0.

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  17. Difficult to imagine that the amazing Monarda is a wild flower, it looks like some exotic hybrid. Your photos are stunning Beth.

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    1. Thank you, Chloris. Yes, it's a dominant summer wildflower up at our cottage, in certain parts of the property. I agree--it looks like it belongs in a tropical climate.

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  18. Lovely images, Beth. Mother Nature is a great flower arranger!

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    1. Thanks, Rose. That is so true! I'm trying to borrow more ideas from Mother Nature as I plan gardens and floral arrangements. :)

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  19. Ciao! Bellissimo blog, l'ho scoperto ora e vedo piante bellissime! Complimenti, ti seguirò con piacere :)

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    1. Grazie! I will follow your blog now, too. Italy is one of my favorite places to visit.

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  20. Replies
    1. Thank you. Nature's bouquets are fascinating. :)

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  21. Lovely photos of interesting plants I have never encountered before ! Lots we don't have here in the uk ...

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    1. Thank you, Jane. I think of the U.K. as kind of the garden capital of the world, and that you can grow just about anything. Some of the plants in this post are marsh plants that prefer wet feet. They are all growing wild up at our cottage.

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  22. Very very beautiful Beth. A natural meadow is universally appealing I think. Thank you for sharing your other Home.

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    1. Thanks, Susie. :) There's a story about the meadow, which I hope to share in a future post...

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  23. Pretty images, I especially like the water drop. I find it relaxing taking photos in nature, much more so than in the garden with all the color.

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    1. Thanks, Donna. Jewelweed is an interesting plant. I'm thinking it might be a fun "plant of the month" one of these days.

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  24. superb photos, Beth, like eye candy.

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    1. Thank you, Sue. Nature offers the beauty, and the more I learn the more fascinated I become. :)

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    1. Thanks, Angie. The meadow with the Monarda and the Daisy Fleabane caught my eye first. Actually, in retrospect, I probably should have picked some of the flowers for a bouquet! :)

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  26. Lovely! I especially liked the water drop, as well as your last photo. Nature is full of wonderful images, if we only stop to see them.

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    1. So true, Deb! So much of my gardening inspiration comes from plants I see in nature.

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  27. Mother Nature is the most brilliant artist. She never needs any help. Just beautiful! :o)

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    1. Yes, that's the truth, Tammy! I really need to pick some bouquets of the wildflowers on our property. To-date I've simply explored the place and taken notes. I easily could have picked som of these for a fun arrangement. Maybe next time...

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  28. Absolutely beautiful Beth, and beautifully captured too! I recognise the thistle but I am not sure I have seen the rest.

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    1. Thanks, Helene! They are native plants that grow at our cottage. We didn't plant any of them, and I doubt the previous owners did, either. It's fun to see how the natural landscape changes from year to year.

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