March 05, 2014

Wordless Wednesday: Shagbarks in March

trunk

bark1

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buds

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Wordless Wednesday

Tree Following

Shagbark Hickories I

Shagbark Hickories II

32 comments:

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    1. Yes, one might think something is wrong with it, but the shedding bark is perfectly normal. :)

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  2. What a magnificent tree, is it native?

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    1. Yes, it is native to most of the Eastern U.S., Southeastern Canada, and even parts of Northern Mexico!

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  3. The Shagbark creates a design and artistry . . . I enjoyed this.

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    1. Thanks, Lynne. Yes, I'll try to get some closer macros next time. It really is extraordinary.

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  4. Thanks for reminding me of one of my favorite trees in my former state of Connecticut. That bark invites touching and staring.

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    1. You're welcome, Lee. I agree--I have a thing about bark, and this tree has very distinctive bark.

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  5. It's hard not to think the bark is the special-ist part of a tree.

    There will be a link box for Tree Following posts on Loose and Leafy tomorrow (March 7th). It'll stay open for seven days.
    http://looseandleafy.blogspot.co.uk/
    Lucy

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    1. I agree, although this tree has fascinating buds, too. I think my favorite time of year for the Shagbark Hickory is when the buds swell and then break. They look like candles. I expect that will probably happen in May this year.

      Thanks, Lucy. I will be linking in. :)

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    1. Yes, definitely. It would be fun sometime to do a post about various species of trees and their unique bark. ;-)

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  7. One can certainly see how this tree with shaggy bark got its name. It is a tree with character, and it is a great landscape tree!

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    1. Definitely a tree with character--that is a good way to put it, Deb! They all have their own unique personalities, don't they?

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  8. Oh, nice craggy-shaggy bark! Talk about texture!

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    1. ;-) Yes, very true, Jason. I learned recently that some bats make their homes in the crevices of the Shagbark Hickory bark.

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  9. Lovely! Now I see where this tree got its name!

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  10. How beautiful is that! Tree bark is so interesting and you captured it wonderfully! Happy belated WW!

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    1. Thank you! I'm going to try to get some even closer macros in the months ahead. It's nifty how stuff like snow gets lodged behind the peeling bark.

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  11. That's one shaggy barked tree...and I do so love the perspective of the first shot. One of my favorite types to take, those long leading lines...sigh.

    Jen

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    1. Thanks, Jen. It's definitely a photogenic tree. And, yes, I agree--there's something about looking up into the heaven-reaching branches of a "wise, old tree." ;-)

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  12. What a fabulous tree - and one I'd not heard of before. And living in northern Europe, there's no particular reason I should but I used to visit - and was peripherally involved with - Westonbirt Arboretum in Gloucestershire, England and there is a shagbark hickory there. I obviously missed out because I can't remember ever seeing it. Thank you for introducing it to me.
    Best wishes for the Tree Following project.
    Carole

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    1. Thanks, Carole! How interesting that the arboretum in Gloucestershire had a Shagbark. They're fun trees!

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  13. Lovely close-ups of the bark – makes me want to stretch out and touch it! Very appropriate name for a tree, but also quite a modern name, wonder if it was called the same hundreds of years ago?

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    1. Thanks, Helene. Yes, it definitely invites tactile exploration! That's a very good question about the history of the nickname. I will do a little research and include it in a future post. ;-)

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  14. I'm a big fan of bark, and that bark is truly magnificent! So very tactile, it demands to be touched.

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    1. Yes, so true! I know, comparing bark among a variety of trees, and studying them all--so much fun! I guess I'm a bark nerd in addition to being a plant nerd.

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  15. I love the bark of this tree...such a wonderful tree with loads of character and whimsy.

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    1. Yeah, it's pretty nifty. It's a common tree around here, but the color of the bark kind of blends in when you see it surrounded by Oaks and other trees. Our Shagbarks are right outside our kitchen window near the bird feeders, so we see a constant show of the wildlife they support. :)

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  16. We have a 100 year+ shagbark in our front garden. It would be interesting to compare notes ... we're based in the Niagara region of southern Ontario. I hope to hear back from you.

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    1. Lucky you, Sarah! Yes, I do want to compare notes! How long have you lived near this great tree. Any tips or reflections about your Shagbark?

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