February 21, 2014

Tree Following: Shagbark Hickories

Do you know what type of bud this is?

hickory bud

If you guessed Shagbark Hickory (Carya ovata), you are right! No, this photo wasn't taken in my garden recently. Actually, it was from early May of last year.

So much promise in a bud of any type, but Hickory buds are particularly fun.

hicory buds

Lucy at Loose and Leafy is hosting a "tree following" meme, and I've decided to participate this year. I'll include at least one post a month featuring the Shagbark Hickories in our garden, which are so fun to watch throughout the seasons.

hickory collage

To learn more about Shagbark Hickories, check out my "plant of the month" post here.

To learn about other trees people are following from around the world, visit Lucy at Loose and Leafy.

29 comments:

  1. What a very, very beautiful and interesting tree. So glad you have chosen this to follow. I don't think I've ever met any kind of hickory so will be fascinated to learn about it as the year goes by.

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    1. Yes, it's a unique tree--not so much in this part of the world, and yet it grows in among Oak trees so it's not quite as plentiful. And it hosts a lot of wildlife.

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  2. Not sure if my comment went to the right place. I enjoyed seeing and learning about the Shagbark Hickory. A friend recently brought me some muffins filled with Hickory nuts from Wisconsin. Yum!

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    1. Yes, got it. :) Ah, I've heard that Hickory nuts are tasty. We don't harvest them, because it's quite a process. Plus, the squirrels get most of them before we even have a chance.

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  3. Hi again, I wrote a long comment but it has disappeared into the ether! Ah well, software is an imperfect science. Basically, I wrote about how moved I was by your "I'm following a Tree" emblem and why....maybe someday it will appear somewhere although who knows where-:))

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    1. Sorry, Susie. I heard something about Blogger having some issues a few days ago. I think they've ironed out the problem now. I do apologize! Thanks--the emblem was created by Lucy Corrander, who's hosting the meme. Do join in! I think it's going to be a very interesting journey this year.

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  4. Great idea for a post! I would love to have a shagbark hickory in our garden. Unfortunately, when the houses on this block were built, the builder went for cheap and fast growing trees: silver maple, Siberian elm, Cottonwood, eastern red cedar. We have a Hackberry out front on the parkway that the city planted after a maple died.

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    1. Sounds like you have some excellent trees, too--you should think about joining in! Our Shagbarks were here when we moved in. They're located not too far from the house and provide roosting and cover for birds that can then hop on over to the feeders for seed. Great location for bird-watching!

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  5. Thanks for the posting. Shagbark Hickory is indeed interesting. Jack

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    1. Certainly! Lucy reminded me about the meme, and I realized what a great one it is. I'm looking forward to all the tree posts this year.

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  6. It's a beautiful tree, Beth, and I love the collage!

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    1. Thanks, Tatyana. Yes, we have a pair of them here so we are blessed. They're so fun to watch during the spring!

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  7. I have never seen those buds before. Sounds so interesting.

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    1. Yes, it is an interesting tree--in all seasons, but especially in the spring.

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  8. I remember your post about the Shagbark Hickories, I don’t think I have ever seen one before but it is always interesting to be introduced to new trees :-)
    Thanks for letting us know about the tree following meme, I might add one of mine there next month.
    Have a great Sunday!

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    1. Great--I hope you will join the meme, too, Helene! Shagbark Hickories are common in the Eastern and Central U.S. Not as common as Oaks, but not too hard to find in a deciduous forest. And I can probably think of something interesting to post about them each month. Fun trees!

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  9. We have one lone shagbark here. Years ago I moved a dozen or so 8' tall shagbarks for a guy with our homemade tree mover. Talk about deep tap roots, oh, my. I had to crawl in the tree spade hole with an ax to cut the tap root, and I felt terribly about it. But ten years later, those transplanted trees are all thriving.

    As payment for my services, the owner of the hickories being moved told me I could take one for our garden, so I dug a tiny little 2' tall tree with it's corresponding 3' long tap root. He thought I was silly for taking the littlest one, but I'm glad I did. It's now about 10' tall. Every spring I am thrilled to see those huge buds unfurl. They are stunning trees!

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    1. Wow, I'm surprised you were successful with transplanting them considering their deep taproots! Yes, aren't the buds fascinating! What I'd really like to do is catch them every day from like mid-April until the end of May. So fun to watch.

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  10. What amazing buds, I'm going to really enjoy reading your tree posts!

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    1. I'm glad you're joining in the meme, too. This will be fun!

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  11. Those are stunning, sigh...I"m a real tree lover.

    Jen

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    1. I hope you'll join in, too, Jen. I love trees, too. They support so much wildlife!

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  12. Thanks! I learned about a tre I didn't know. I love trees!

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    1. Glad you liked it--it is a fascinating tree!

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  13. I absolutely love shagbark hickories and plan to put one in our yard in the back at some point. The bark is just so awesome! I've never seen the buds before, as I've never lived close to any shagbarks until recently. Very interesting!

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    1. Yeah, they kind of blend in to the forest because of the bark color. But the shape of the bark is so distinctive. And the buds are like no others in the way they form, swell, and break. Very fun to watch!

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  14. Sounds like a fun meme! We have an old shagbark hickory at the far end of our yard, but it's lost a lot of branches and not particularly attractive anymore. Still, it's one of only two original trees left here, so we think it's pretty special.

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    1. Oh, that's too bad. :( Although, it sounds like it's a pretty old tree--I wonder how old? Those are the ones to treasure, aren't they? The buds on Shagbark Hickories are unlike any others. They kind of remind me of Magnolias the way they swell and then pop out. Fascinating to see over the course of several days.

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  15. What an interesting tree to choose Beth...looking forward to reading more about it.

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