April 15, 2012

Mayapples in April

April is behaving like April. By that, I mean the weather is closer to the normal patterns we’d expect for this time of year. But because we had an extended stretch of summer in March, the plant growing patterns are way off base.

In a normal year here, the Redbud tree would bloom for about a week in mid-May, around prom time. This year it began blooming toward the end of March, so it has given us a vibrant show for nearly three weeks.


The Daffodils I planted in the fall have been blooming that entire time, too.


Crabapples of all shades are in their prime.




Other lovelies in full bloom include Lamium, Jack-in-the-Pulpit, blue and yellow Wood Violets, and Vinca.






I wasn't sure the Dicentra would survive several nights in the high 20s without cover, but they're coming on strong now.


Some blooms are past prime, but still sweet, including the Flowering Almond.


Many flowers—most way ahead of schedule—are just about to pop. The Mayapples emerged in mid-March, and are now about to bloom.


Others gearing up for bloom time include Dwarf Korean Lilacs, Trilliums, and Lily-of-the-Valley.





It’s a strange spring. But it sure is putting on a fabulous show! Thanks to Carol at May Dreams Gardens for hosting Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day on the 15th of each month!

51 comments:

  1. you have a lot of nice woodland plants. i've got a jack-in-the-pulpit that comes up every year, but then something eats it back down to the ground. i'm not sure how many years it can keep going like that, but i doubt it would survive a move either, so i leave it, hoping one year it will get to bloom.

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    1. That would be frustrating! Actually, we have lots of them in the woods. The one shown here just caught my eye with the sun lighting it from the side in the morning. I wonder what kind of animal (bug?) would eat Jack-in-the-Pulpit? Deer?

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    2. i really don't know. i thought deer or rabbits, but i've read that neither of those usually bother it because of compounds in it that taste bad. i will probably keep trying, and maybe add a few more...love that flower!

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  2. Every post I've read from the Northern Hemisphere says the same as you, that this year the plants are confused by the weather. Here in Australia we are in a typical Autumn.
    I love your spring blooms.

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    1. Thank you! Interesting how the weather fluctuates from normal to abnormal from season to season. But this spring is the strangest Wisconsin spring I've ever experienced. We had a most ordinary summer last year, which would be alright by me after this weird spring. Happy autumn!

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  3. The May Apples are early, here too! You have a beautiful selection of blooms this April and images with great composition and views. I love your woodland flowers, but my favorite is the last photo with the pretty pink DOF background. Happy GBBD.

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    1. Thanks, Donna! Lily-of-the-Valley is my favorite groundcover and I planted them all. Over time, they're taking over the base of one garden bed. When they're in bloom, the scent is so sweet!

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    1. Thanks, Mary! Now I need to get out in the garden and tidy things up!

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  5. You have a really nice selection of blooms. My jack in the pulpit is up too. I wasn't sure I would see it this year since it seemed a bit late (as opposed to everything else being early).

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    1. Thanks, Karin! That's interesting that we would have Jacks blooming at the same time. This is early for us. I think they're so fascinating, and I love the fact that they're native to the Eastern U.S.

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  6. Oh, your crabapple blooms are sensational! I would love to just sit under there and feel their little petals falling all around. The dwarf korean lilac is fabulous, too. And I love the lily of the valley! Happy GBBD!

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    1. Thanks, Holley. Even my daughter, who doesn't notice plants much, remarked yesterday how incredible the Crabapples are this year. The scent is so sweet! And the white one is up on a slight incline. Looking up into it the other day was pure joy! Lily-of-the-Valley is a personal fave, too. :)

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  7. aloha,

    beautiful, i loved that field of dicentra, at least it looks like a whole field, thanks for sharing your garden this morning.

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    1. Thanks, Noel! Aloha! Actually, that particular garden bed where the Dicentra are located is full of various perennials, including two pink and one white Bleeding Heart plants. I'm so happy they made it through the cold nights because I didn't cover them at all.

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  8. Having recently spent some time in Southwest Michigan, all these plants/flowers are so familiar to me! And since I am moving North for the summer, many of these plants will make their way into my landscaping! I love *love*! spring in the Northern part of the US! Simply gorgeous Beth!

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    1. Oh Diane, you're going to love Michigan in spring and summer! Is your place near the dunes? We used to vacation over there when I was a kid. I can't wait to hear about your new garden! Cheers!

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  9. Beth how strange that our gardens are similar with some flowers and totally different with others...no Jacks or Mayapples yet, but I have violets, Brunnera, forget-me-nots blooming and bleeding hearts just starting...

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    1. It is very strange. If it wasn't so beautiful and lush, I'd be even more upset. I hope things will normalize this summer, but wow it has been a showy, extended spring. Maybe this is what springtime is like in some of the more southern states. I like it!

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  10. It's a pleasure to see all the different varieties you can grow. Your spring garden is outstanding! Happy GBBD!

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    1. Thanks, Cat! It's a beauty this year. Actually, springtime is always fantastic here, but usually it only lasts from mid-April through May. So, I'm trying to savor it while it lasts. :)

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  11. I liked your blog, many wonderful photos! Most of all is your Dicentra on top, I've like this near my patio.

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    1. Thank you! Dicentra always seems so fragile, but I guess it's hardier than I thought. It would be a great plant to view near a patio!

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  12. Replies
    1. Thank you! Now we're in another cool snap, so the blooms should last even longer. :)

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  13. I'm pretty sure my mayapples bloomed in late March this year... I miss crabapple trees from my days growing up in Michigan. There was one I liked to sit in. I don't see them often in the South.

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    1. Wow, Mayapple blooms in March! Yeah, the Crabapples are a benefit of this northern climate. I think they're the prettiest this year that I've ever seen them.

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  14. Our spring has been early as well. At first, I was just as confused as the plants seemed to be. Now, I am enjoying all the lovely blooms. You have so much blooming in your garden.

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    1. I know, me too. I'm just trying to take it all in. I'm too busy anyway to do anything but just enjoy as much as possible. :)

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  15. This is really the best time of year! I am glad you are enjoying so many blooms, they all look so lovely! Thank you for these pictures, here the crabapples and daffodils are mostly done, and it was nice to look at them again here.

    Thank you for your comment on my blog - you made my day!

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    1. Thank you, Masha! I can't believe it, but in the past two days the Crabs and Daffodils have waned. The show was amazing while it lasted. Then, again, the Lilies-of-the-Valley and the Trilliums--two of my favorites--are just coming into full bloom! I really meant what I said, and you are so wise in your comment on my last post. Thus, the balancing act. I'll always look forward to your posts.

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  16. I enjoyed seeing all of your blooms, both high and low. Our weather is more seasonal now, too, but the progression of blooms is already early and underway.

    You have more diversity in your growing spaces. I don't have enough shade to grow some of the beauties you have, such as Jack in a pulpit and mayapples. My little clump of trillium is on the east side of the house. It is not doing much. I love yours!

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    1. It's interesting what you say about diversity, Sue. There was a time when I didn't appreciate the shade much. But since I've discovered more spring ephemerals and woodland plants, I've really come to enjoy the shady part as much as the sunny sections. I enjoyed my trip to your blog today, too.

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  17. Hi Beth. Your (strange) spring blooms are won-der-ful!

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    1. Thanks so much, Dona! With more cool weather and some rain, we have a whole new set of blooms about to burst. :)

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  18. So wonderful to see all the fresh and fabulous blooms in spring.

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    1. Thank you, Autumn Belle! Before I started blogging, I didn't realize the timing of the first spring blooms could vary so much from year to year. We had a late spring last year, and an early one this year. Hopefully, next year we'll be back to "normal."

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  19. So many lovely blooms, Beth! I don't know how I missed this post earlier... You're at the peak of what I think is my favorite time of year. I almost wish some of my bloomers had waited until now when it was cooler so they would have lasted longer.

    I was just thinking the same thing yesterday about April; it has been much more "normal" than March, though we could sure use some April showers. I covered up my bleeding heart on those cold nights, because somewhere I read they were cold-sensitive. They came through just fine, but I wish I had covered up some other plants that don't look so hot now!

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    1. Hi Rose: Yes, we finally got some needed April showers yesterday and today. I imagine with sunshine in the next few days we'll find more colorful surprises. I'm glad your Bleeding Heart plants survived the cold snaps. I'm planning to cover a few things (hopefully for the last time this season) tonight.

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  20. What a beautiful time of year!! Great pics I LOVE your blooms, those crapapples are so sweet, I may have to find room in my yard for one of those, just beautiful! My garden seems to be a little early this year, but for the most part right on track. Now only if I could keep my garden in this beautiful blooming state all year. Gosh these blooms make me want to sing! Happy Springtime blooms Beth =)

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    1. Thanks, Julia! I love this time of year, too. But my favorite days of springtime are a little warmer--when the Peonies and Irises bloom, and when I can plant veggies and annuals! I'm getting anxious now. Cheers!

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  21. oh your garden is just gorgeous right now! By the blooms, it appears you're ahead of us?!! I think you've definitely been warmer although our March broke the snow pattern.
    Love your Easter bouquet and many thanks for your wonderfully nice comments. I hope I'm on my way back to blogging since I'm slowing down on Pinterest lately!

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    1. Thanks, Kathleen. Since we were warmer than Texas and Oklahoma several days in March, I guess it's not surprising that everything is blooming early here this year. The Crabapples have finished their amazing show, and we're in a bit of a transition period. I've had a crazy week at work, so I'm just now getting back to blogging, too. I haven't visited Pinterest in more than a month! Glad to see you're back to blogging--you know I'm a big fan of Kasey's Korner!

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  22. Beautiful photos of the spring colors in your garden. My garden is so far behind. Oh for a slightly higher garden zone. Spring came early in southern Ontario -- June weather in March, but we still don't have the blooms and blossoms you do. Getting wonderfully green, though. Thanks for sharing your photos.

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    1. Hi Lorraine: Usually I feel "zone challenged," too. :) But not this year. This has been one of the most delightful springtimes in my memory. It makes me think I belong in Virginia or South Carolina--where they always have decent weather from March through May. Enjoy your blooms yet to come--we'll all be envious when your locale brightens up with color!

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  23. Beautiful!! I love jack-in-the-pulpits. Such cool plants! My lilacs just started to bloom and smell wonderful!

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    1. I agree! Mmmmm, I'm imagining the scent of Lilacs. Some of ours are blooming, too, and the Dwarf Koreans should bloom after this cold snap. Enjoy!

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  24. This array of blooming is heart lifting. Loved the crabapples particularly. Mayapples are confined to specialist nurseries here but ideal for my conditions and so lovely - like late flowering Hellebores. Thanks for the ID of Korean lilac. Spotted one in a square yesterday and was puzzled by its diminuitive size.

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    1. Thanks, Laura! I didn't realize it's difficult to get Mayapples in England. They're kind of strange plants, but they seem to have their favorite places in the woods. I understand it's common to find Morel Mushrooms near them, but I've never found one.

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  25. It's so good to see all those familiar faces of the plants I have left behind..it's much drier up here.

    Jen @ Muddy Boot Dreams

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    1. I'm so looking forward to your posts about your new garden, Jen. It's always fun to witness the joy of someone enjoying a new locale!

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