December 09, 2022

Before the Snow

snow

Autumn and winter are playing tag in my part of the world lately. We've had cold days and snowy days, followed by rainy, sunny, and relatively mild days. This morning, Mother Nature blanketed the garden with a fresh coat of snow. It will probably melt on the weekend with milder temperatures, but it's pretty while it lasts.

Before the snow, I took a quick tour around the garden yesterday to note the highlights of the late autumn garden.

rubrum

Most years, the Epimediums ('Rubrum' here) are chewed to the ground by the rabbits this time of year. Rabbit activity, for some reason, is lighter this autumn.

warleyense ajuga juniper

I like the stacking here of the Juniper shrub, Epimedium x warleyense, and the Ajuga groundcover.

sedum

Sedum 'Autumn Joy' is a favorite in the garden this time of year with its colorful seed heads.

moss

Moss on rocks and other surfaces keeps the green character going throughout the winter.

hellebore

The Hellebores retain their umbrella foliage until I trim them in the spring.

hakone

I'm trying to get some swaths of Hakone grass (Hakonechloa macra) going, to spill over the rock wall. I've had limited success (rabbit damage, slow growth, etc.) But this one survives with a little help from caging at the base. I hope it will fill in more in the years to come.

echinacea

I leave the garden seed heads, including Echinacea, up over the winter for bird food and for insects that might be overwintering in the stems. I think they also add character to the winter garden.

echinacea and mistflower

This combo of Coneflowers (E. purpurea) and Blue Mistflowers (Conoclinium coelestinum) is fun.

allium

The 'Ozawa' Allium (A. thunbergii) I profiled in my last post is still holding its color and form.

How is your garden faring as the seasons shift? Soon the days will be consistently cold and snowy, and winter will take hold here. Things are getting festive as we shift toward the holidays...

wreath

16 comments:

  1. Nice views of the seasonal shift in your part of the country, Beth. wouldn't it be nice if rabbits hibernated?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Kris. Yes, it would be nice if they hibernated and if there were very few of them. ;-) Here in the suburbs, they don't have enough natural predators.

      Delete
  2. Beth your garden is beautiful in its decay especially the epimediums. Similar weather here but it looks like after snow tomorrow we stay cold.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Donna. I'm happy that the rabbits haven't eaten the Epimedium foliage this fall. Stay warm!

      Delete
  3. Hello Beth, I always enjoy your posts. We leave our garden seed heads as well. This morning we had a flock of goldfinch eating on the coneflower heads, it is always fun to see.
    Happy Christmas Season!
    Carla

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Carla. :) Yes, it is so fun (and gratifying) to watch the birds and critters munching on the seed heads.

      Delete
  4. Lovely set of autumn shots before the snow. I love the look of seed heads, they have such a simple beauty, even more so when birds are nibbling at the offerings.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. With all that's now known about the benefits of leaving the garden stems and seed heads through the winter, I can't imagine removing them until spring. Fun to know they're helping the birds, insects, bees, and other garden friends to survive.

      Delete
  5. So nice that you caught the hellebores against that carpet of pinkish brown leaves. Happy Holidays :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Love the Hellebores, for so many reasons. Happy Holidays, Hollis!

      Delete
  6. It took me forever to get Hakonechloa to established. I think I finally caged it for a while. Now the rabbits mostly leave it alone. Don't think I've had them eat my Epimediums in the autumn. They're constantly surprising. Love the look of the oak leaves beneath the Hellebore. And yes, we did get more snow than you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ah, good to know. Thanks. I might try to cage a larger area for them. True: You never know what the rabbits will go for. Our snow is almost melted, but it looks like next weekend will be colder and bring more snow.

      Delete
  7. Snow--lovely. Here, some precious rain. Garden looks a bit scruffy with highlights (roses, ripening oranges) but that's okay in December. Your Hellebore looks like it is getting ready for spring--wonderful flowers to look forward to. Some of the small mail order Hellebores i planted 2 1/2 years ago look to be preparing to "leap"--here's hoping!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm glad you're getting your needed rain! Your roses are amazing! The Hellebore foliage stays green and healthy through the winter, even under the snow. They're fabulous early spring bloomers.

      Delete
  8. The snow scene is beautiful. I love how you've highlighted the graceful aging of coneflowers and other plants still providing lovely interest. We've had some cold weather, but honestly cherry and apricot trees in the neighborhood are blooming and today in my garden I came across a hyacinth forming.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Susie. Oh my goodness: blooming fruit trees! That is so far off for me. I will have to live vicariously through your blog until March. :)

      Delete

Thanks for stopping by!

Your comment might not appear right away (even though we love you). PlantPostings uses comment moderation, and we read every comment before we publish.

ANONYMOUS VISITORS: Security updates mean your comments likely will NOT be published. Sorry. Also, comments with hyperlinks might not make it through the heightened security system.

Have a great gardening day!