April 04, 2020

Shared Grace and Savored Grace

pollinator
Pollinator on Crocus vernus 'Pickwick'

It's that time of year when blog posts are out of date by the time I get them up and published. These photos are from two days ago, and some of these blooms are fading now. It's also the time of year, in my climate, when plants that bloom in a more staggered timeline in a warmer climate bloom all at once here in the north (USDA zone 5a).

galanthus 'flore pleno'
Galanthus nivalis  'Flore Pleno'

galanthus
Galanthus nivalis

eranthis
Eranthus hyemalis

Blooms considered winter flowers in the south (Snowdrops and Winter Aconites) must wait until March or April to bloom here.

tommies
Crocus tommasinianus

Because of our cool temperatures but plenty of sun, the 'Tommie' Crocuses have been blooming for about a week now.

crocus vernus 1
Crocus vernus

crocus vernus 2
C. vernus

The larger Dutch Crocuses are blooming at the same time as the "earlier" flowers. (I find it fascinating how the same flower can look very different when photographed at different times of day, in different light, and from different angles.)

crocus vernus 'pickwick'
C. vernus 'Pickwick'

These striped beauties are in a very sunny spot. They appear to be multiplying and they seem to be favorites of the pollinators. I keep lava rocks and foil around them to discourage squirrels and chipmunks from digging, and rabbits from eating.

narcissus 'tete-a-tete'
Narcissus 'Tete-a-Tete'

The tiny Daffodils are at their peak.

narcissus
Trumpet Narcissus

Larger Narcissus are just beginning.

hyacinth
Hyacinthus orientalis

It won't be long for the Hyacinths.

helleborus 'sandy shores'
Helleborus 'Sandy Shores'

Finally, the Hellebores definitely will be blooming today. This one, from two days ago, is a first bloom on a new plant for me: I'll look forward to its open face within hours. The other Hellebores, in a different spot, started opening yesterday.

During these difficult times, sharing our plant-love and gardening joys is more important than ever. That is our shared grace. On the day that I photographed these first flowers, I saw my first butterfly of the season. My heart jumped and I smiled, even though no one was looking. I didn't have my camera handy, and I wasn't able to follow it, so I don't know if it was a Mourning Cloak or an Eastern Comma, because it fluttered up and away too fast. But it was a sign of hope. It was a savored grace.

25 comments:

  1. So pretty . . . all.
    Can’t help but bring cheer . . .
    Galanthus nivalis . . . common name?
    I think it is a “first” for me.

    So far the only ones popping out for me are the Helebores.
    They have been under leaf cover, which I am
    in the process of raking up . . . CAREFULLY.

    Happy Spring . . . ”it’s the little things.”
    Like a fluttering butterfly!

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    1. Yes, that's the Latin name for the snowdrops. My Hellebores are blooming now, too. They are so hardy, aren't they? Happy spring, Lynne!

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  2. Spring is so grounding in these difficult times. Thanks for sharing your photos and thoughts.

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    1. Yes, it's such a hopeful time of year in the middle of such a scary, disruptive time. Take care, Lisa.

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  3. Lovely photos of beautiful flowers, Beth. The sight of a butterfly is indeed a sign of hope. The song of the birds, and even the crows pulling apart pieces of my peppermint willows looking for just the right stems to build their nests, strike me as affirmations of life.

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    1. Oh, yes, all those things, Kris. Thank you. Everything is getting really green around here, which is so rewarding. :)

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  4. Aren't these first flowers of spring so uplifting. I can't get enough of them. 'Our' House Wren is back. A full week early. It is so wonderful hearing him sing his heart out even though it is still awfully chilly and a cold spell is coming in. My DB and I were standing in the garden together and he saw a Mourning Cloak fly by. I was looking in the opposite direction and missed it. Bah... I have seen native bees, flies, and a black beetle of some sort already. OH yes and a bumble bee. All this just makes you realize life will go on. Cheers...have a great week.

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    1. Yes, they are! A bumble bee! Now that is exciting, Lisa! We've had a house wren around here, too. What a sweet little singer! A few cool days ahead, but with the next warm snap, everything is going to pop. Happy spring!

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  5. Savored grace, indeed. Been wondering how you're faring. Good to see your lovely blooms in their photographed (equally lovely!) form. Take care, be safe, Beth.

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    1. Hi Tina: Glad you're doing well, too. Thank you. Stay safe and healthy!

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  6. Your photos are always amazing Beth. At last you have spring flowers and soon you will catch up with us.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you, Chloris. It seems like everything happens at once here. We will have a cold snap next week, and then I'm sure everything will pop at the same time. The Magnolias are just about to bloom.

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  7. Beautiful post Beth, your words and photos.

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    1. Thanks, Carla. I hope you and your family are happy, healthy, and safe.

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  8. Wonderful photographs - such clarity and sharpness. Keep well, and we're already looking forward to Madison 2021.

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    1. Thanks, Jason. 2020 is a weird year. I thought it was going to be better. But in some ways, it is. Anyway, the 2021 Fling will be great, even though we have to wait another year.

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  9. That's a beautiful Galanthus! I have never seen such a beautiful flower in white and green.

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    1. They are pretty little things, aren't they? I need to divide that patch. Blessings to you and your family!

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  10. Beautiful, each and every one of them!
    I can hardly wait until the 15th and Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day. We all need the beauty of flowers now more than ever.
    Be careful, stay safe, and God bless you!

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    Replies
    1. Hi Lea: Thank you! I need to gear up for that. Yes, this will be an especially needed GBBD. :)

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  11. So what if they are old pictures - they are new to me and I enjoyed them!
    Jeannie@GetMeToTheCountry

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  12. Your close-up images of your blooms are wonderful! Thank you for sharing them. It's almost like I am kneeling in the dirt with the flower inches from my face, but you have done the bending and reaching for me!

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