June 09, 2019

Garden Patterns, Textures, and Colors

ferns

Lately, I'm noticing patterns, textures, and colors in a different way. It's hard to explain, but many surprisingly pleasant views are catching my eye--like the Ostrich Ferns in the back garden, lined up to capture the morning light.

cottonwood seeds

This is not a pleasant view, but definitely a pattern and texture example--the Hostas lining the driveway are now covered in Cottonwood seeds from several neighborhood trees. Everything is coated in fluff and debris, and it won't end for at least another week. (I'm trying to be patient, because I recognize the trees' and seeds' ecological value. It just makes for a very messy garden. It also illustrates why most of my photos in this post have messy fluff all over them.)

sedum and petunias

Some of the patterns, colors, and textures are intentional, like this combination of chartreuse Mexican Stonecrop (S. mexicanum) with Wave Petunia 'Carmine Velour.' Last year, a patch of overwintered Supertunia Vista Bubblegum was in the same pot with the Sedums, but the Supertunia didn't survive a second winter in the sunroom. Both combinations offer pleasant pops of color and companion textures.

salvia and lantana

While I've had this combination in my garden for several years now--'May Night' Salvia (Salvia x sylvestris) with various Lantanas and Marigolds--I happened to glance over and notice the way the purple/blue Salvia was framing the orange hues of the other flowers from this angle.

shamrocks and ivy

Another pot I've overwintered for several years now combines English Ivy (Hedera helix) with Purple Shamrocks (Oxalis triangularis).

alternanthera and ivy

Continuing the same color scheme with Threadleaf Alternanthera (A. dentata).

purple and ivy

Together, across the back wall of the pond, they create waves of burgundy, purple, and green.

new guinea and coleus

'Sonic Light Pink' New Guinea Impatien (I. hawkeri) is another good pairing with chartreuse foliage--here, with Coleus (Solenostemon) 'Colorblaze Lime Time.'

shade foliage

We've had plentiful precipitation this spring, so all the foliage seems extra lush. Hostas, Convallaria, Epimediums, Sedums, and Hellebores (including the little Hellebore seed pods) form a carpet in various shades of green.

alliums and clematis

This combination was a happy accident. 'Nelly Moser' Clematis is a long-standing garden staple. I added several Allium 'Globemaster' bulbs along the back wall last fall, and was pleasantly surprised to see how they mimic the lavender/pink color scheme of the Clematis.

Everywhere I turn, there are new pleasant vignettes. Are you discovering or rediscovering patterns, textures, and colors in your garden this season?

16 comments:

  1. I love those strolls through the garden when one vignette after another catches the eye. Your garden looks lovely, Beth. I love the purple-burgundy and green combinations in particular and you've reminded me that I need to find some more Alternanthera as many of mine died out last year. Right now, in my own garden, I'm enjoying the view out my office window of the orange Leucospermum, fading but still fabulous, framed by red-orange Lobelia laxiflora.

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    1. Thank you, Kris. I tend to go a little more wild with my potted annuals than with the plants that go in the ground. I'm aiming more and more toward natives for the perennials, but it's fun to try new and exotic options in the pots. The view out your office window sounds stunning!

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  2. I love noticing great combinations of textures and patterns, not to mention color, to.

    Thanks for sharing some of yours!

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    1. Agreed, Lisa. I guess it happens every year for me, but this year my time is more limited so the views are hitting me in a different way.

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  3. That Alternanthera combination is especially nice. Beautiful foliage combinations in your garden with all the ferns and hostas. The Cottonwood fluff is enough to make me sneeze from here!

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    1. Thank you, Shirley. I discovered this thinleaf Alternanthera last year, and it works so well with the other plants in that location. Ugh...the Cottonwood fluff. ;-)

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  4. Love that swath of ferns. All my plants are coated with white from the extreme dogwood flowering this spring.

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    1. I guess it's been a good spring for boosting the health and seeding of a lot of plants. Good for future years, but a bit messy.

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  5. The colors, shapes, contrasts and textures in your photos have helped me see my garden with new eyes. I love the Mexican Stonecrop - Wave Petunia combination! And the sunlight through the ferns... just lovely.

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    1. Thank you, Kate. Sometimes Mother Nature creates amazing vignettes; other times plant combinations are happy accidents. Occasionally, the planned pairings work out and even exceed expectations. :)

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  6. Messy fluff? Nah, it's just summer snow. Lots of lovely patterns in your garden. Here, I'm mostly noticing that it's time to remove a lot of plants.

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  7. Great set of contrasting textures. I had to chuckle--though I'm sympathetic--with your cottonwood woes. On a recent bike ride through a neighborhood just south of my own, a lawn was cover, really covered, with the fluff. It looked like snow, which is unusual enough here in Austin, and would be downright scary in June! Nice post, Beth

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  8. ;-) oh that cottonwood.
    I lost several plants from our -50 below. Very sad! I was blessed today a friend gifted me a huge pink tall phlox. One of the many plants I lost.
    Carla

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  9. Ferns, especially Ostrich Ferns, are great for texture, patterns, and playing with the light - your photo catches that beautifully. And Cottonwoods (we have some big ones across the alley) drive me INSANE.

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  10. The lighting can really illuminate the textures and patterns of our plants. I too love discovering them. It's important that we take time to stop the toiling and just observe, isn't it?

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