April 02, 2018

The Window Boxes of Charleston

azaleas and moss

As we face the reality of a very cold start to April here in the Midwest, I'm remembering our recent trip south. We spent the middle of March in Charleston, South Carolina, and Savannah, Georgia. We pretty much hit the peak of Azalea bloom, and I've never seen healthier, larger Azaleas--blooming just about everywhere we traveled. More about that later.

Of course, the camera and the mind are full of photo and blog post ideas, but I thought I'd start with a quick look at a few of the window boxes in Charleston. They were bright, pretty, and inspirational, and they complemented the city's unique, and mostly historical, architecture.

window box 1

window box 2

window box 3

window box 4

window box 5

window box 6

window box 7

It was a fabulous vacation, and I wish I was back in the South. Thinking about it warms me up a little. More to come on both Charleston and Savannah.

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On another topic, I'm offering readers two great gardening books: "Vegetables Love Flowers" and "Shakespeare's Gardens." To read about them, check the "Products" tab at the top of this blog. Leave a comment on this post, and let me know which book you're interested in. I'll draw two names: one for each book. Good luck!

49 comments:

  1. Gorgeous window boxes! The liriope makes an interesting filler I might try since it's quite forgiving however it's used.

    I never seem to achieve that stuffed to overflowing look.

    Quite a few products on your page. I like the Shakespeare's Garden book. That's an interesting turn on the usual Shakespeare inspired garden at many public gardens.

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    1. Hi Shirley: I agree. I really liked all the combinations--especially decorating the cool historical buildings in the city. If I ever go back, I want to photograph more of these arrangements--they were so creative. Your name will be included in the drawing. :)

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  2. some fancy windows to match those box gardens - perhaps because I do not have a garden, I find windowbox plantings endlessly fascinating and Londoners rely on these mini green spaces.
    p.s. I liked the latter in particular - the pink arum is both an upright and a drooper which window box design relies on
    p.p.s. hope warmer weather blows your way soo

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    1. Hi Laura: I remember some wonderful window boxes from our visit to London, too. It's encouraging to know that no matter how much space a person has, there are options for small-space gardening.

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  3. Another world! And you can just feel the warmth. So tired of our weather. Today is my birthday and I've had many with worse weather so I can't really complain. But it is hard looking at everybody's flowery blogs!

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    1. Happy Birthday, Linda! I'm sure last year's weather at this time was much nicer for your birthday. The snow was pretty today, but ... enough! Time for spring, already. :)

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  4. Love these window boxes. It makes me want to plant up my window box. It won't happen now though. I woke to snow this morning. UGH...

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    1. Snow here now, too, Lisa. We've missed some of the recent storms, so I guess it's our turn. Only 1-3 inches, so it could be much worse. I wish it wasn't so cold, though. I'm having trouble being patient...

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  5. I adore window boxes. I view them as manageable miniature gardens. When we moved into our current place, I was disappointed to find that the only viable spot for some was outside my husband's garage workshop, right where the garbage bins stand in a neat row. However, when my husband built me my lath (shade) house, I commissioned windows and promptly added window boxes.

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    1. Good for you! I remember seeing your awesome little house--a perfect place for window boxes. After seeing these Charleston arrangements, I'm considering adding some here.

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  6. They are so beautiful documentation of window flower pots! I've seen lots of them in Europe only, maybe because i haven't been to the US.

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    1. Yes, I remember seeing them in Europe, too. It's fun to compare them and see which plants and flowers work well together and with the architecture of each house.

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  7. All those window boxes are so pretty! We had a couple of them on one of our sheds but they need to be rebuilt as the wood has rotted out. I'm not sure whether I'll be able to keep whatever I grow in them alive, though - I'll probably have to stick to plants that like it dry :) And I'll throw my hat in the ring for the Vegetables Love Flowers book (obviously, right??)

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    1. Rotten wood would be the challenge. Or, should I say, keeping the wood or containers clean and in good shape. With our extreme cold-to-hot weather, wood and other materials really take a beating. OK, your name is in for the drawing. :)

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  8. Charleston knows how to do window boxes, that's for sure! Gorgeous. I am looking forward to reading about your adventures in these two historic cities.

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    1. Yes, they do, Karin! I honestly don't know where to start with the trip posts. I could go in so many different directions. I'm sure some of the posts/photos will have to wait until next winter. ;-) But I'll sneak a few posts in before the growing season gets going. It was a wonderful trip!

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  9. I dream about the boxed balcony boxes this spring. Regards.

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    1. Me, too, Giga, now that I'm back home! For you, I suppose a trip to Italy or Spain or Greece would be similar. Cold climates are tough--especially after a long winter. ;-)

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  10. Hi, I am so excited to hear more about your trip and see all your photos.
    I like the sound of Vegetable Love Flowers :-) thank you for the opportunity.
    Carla

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    1. Sooo many photos of Azaleas! I don't know where to start. These two cities and the surrounding area are great destinations for a spring break. It was cool while we were there, but definitely much more comfortable than anywhere in Wisconsin in March. ;-) I'll add you to the drawing, Carla.

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  11. Oh, lucky you! Aren't the window boxes fabulous?! My youngest lives in Charleston and so I go whenever I can. Can't wait to hear more about your trip.

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    1. Yes, they are. And lucky you, to have family in Charleston! Gosh, the food was incredible there! We didn't have a bad meal. So many good memories. :)

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  12. The window boxes are really nice on those cool old buildings. I've never visited the south and am looking forward to seeing more of your posts!

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    1. Oh gosh, Peter, you would love it! The Azaleas were incredible, not to mention everything else. It's hard to know where to start with posting about it. ;-) It would be neat to have a Fling in one of these cities.

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  13. There's not much to add, except those are just charming! Your photos certainly do them justice, as well!

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    1. Thank you, Tina! I just realized today that I have more window box photos on my iPhone. I guess I'll have to upload them to the Flickr folder for the memories. ;-)

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  14. Yes, I remember the window boxes from that one trip we took to Charleston. As your photos show, they were given much care and creativity. And they really added a soft touch to an area that was so densely built. Great pictures!

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    1. Thanks, Jason. I tried not to slow down the sightseeing progression too much (the fishman is very patient, but this was his vacation, too ;-) ). But I simply had to capture a few of the window scenes. There were so many more...

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  15. Spring of 2018 here in upper Midwest has truly been depressing; thanks for the colorful lifting of my spirits.

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    1. Yes, it has. Worst start to spring that I can remember; maybe I've erased others like this from my memory. Anyway, remembering color and warmth is helping...a little. ;-)

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  16. I'm in Georgia so fairly close to Savannah and Charleston which is one of my favorite places. Love your pictures of the window boxes. It always amazes me how much they put in them.

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    1. Thank you, Dawn. Lucky you! No matter what, you always have a nice, long spring. The folks down there were complaining about how cool it was, but to us it felt so comfortable! Plus, plants were green, growing, and blooming like crazy!

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  17. Replies
    1. Thank you, Lea. I wish I was there right now!

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  18. How beautiful! It is rather fun that you get to experience spring twice! Azaleas are so gorgeous when they are all in bloom. After having lived down south for awhile, I equated March with spring. But up here in New England, spring might not be until May or June this year with the way things are going!

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    1. Thanks, Indie. Given a choice, I'd leave Wisconsin every year for the entire month of February and part of March. The rest of the year, this part of the state is a great place to live. Mid- to late March is usually fun because plants are starting to emerge and bloom. But this year, everything is late for us, too.

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    2. Ooo, and I'd love to enter the drawing for Vegetables Love Flowers - sounds like a great book!

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  19. These window boxes are so pretty, picture perfect, I don't know how they do it, everything growing together, looking so natural.

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    1. I know--I had the same reaction! It's almost as if they're not real, but they are! And this is just a small sample of the window boxes in this beautiful city.

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  20. O I forgot to say I like the Shakespeare book, but I don't imagine the offer includes postage to Australia.

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    1. Oh darn. If you lived in the States it would work. I'm wondering about future giveaways--maybe an offer for an Amazon exchange or something like that. Darn.

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  21. Oh my . . . loved this post.
    Love the ideas it generated in my mind for my one little wall box . . .
    Thank you . . .

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    1. Thanks, Lynne. I'm glad it generated some ideas!

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  22. I would love looking inside, reading
    Shakespeare's Garden," by Jackie Bennett; including photography by Andrew Lawson.

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    1. Great! Your name is added to the drawing for the Shakespeare book. :)

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  23. I've always loved window boxes--these are just beautiful! I'm probably too late for the drawing, but I would love "Shakespeare's Garden." Thanks for highlighting this book, Beth; I am going to see about getting a copy even if I am too late. "A rose by any other name..." :)

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    1. I love window boxes, too. People are so creative with them! Putting your name in the hat for the drawing now!

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  24. I love the way a lush and carefully orchestrated windowbox looks. Will enjoy the pictures as daily watering is not a fun prospect.

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  25. Finally catching up....and these are just stunning Beth. I can see why you didn't want to leave!!

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