September 21, 2014

Garden lessons learned and shared

apples

We've had a lovely transition from summer to fall so far here in the Midwest, aside from a couple of sudden chilly days. The apples are ripe, the leaves are changing colors, and it's time to share your garden lessons learned.

pollinators

Every quarter, gardeners around the world share things they've learned during the past season. Here are your highlights:

Diana at Elephant's Eye, Western Cape, South Africa, is entering the spring season now, with beautiful garden plants and wildflowers blooming aplenty. She learned to combine compost, sand, and garden soil, to give her potted herbs a healthy start.

Jason at Garden in a City, Illinois, U.S., plans to be a little more strategic with his potted plants next growing season. He says he was a "slave to convention" this season, with many pots having the same plants. He'll plan a "big picture" display for next year, taking into account each plant's bloom time.

hummer

Kimberley at Cosmos and Cleome, Pennsylvania, U.S., learned to use the technology in her purse to research plants before purchasing them. She purchased three plants this season that aren't hardy in her zone. We hope these three lovely plants will make it through the winter ahead.

Hannah at Weeding on the Wild Side, in the Pacific Northwest, U.S., has a ramp on an earth berm, and she learned this season which plants thrive in this very xeric and sunny environment. Some of the winners: Oregano, Marjoram, Rosemary, Thyme, Heathers, and Saxifrage.

goldenrod

Rose at Prairie Rose's Garden, Illinois, U.S., is not alone in her desire to improve her identification of young seedling plants, but her humorous stories about it are entertaining. She also describes how creating a garden doesn't have to be expensive. And she wisely advises us to enjoy every moment in the garden.

Donna at Gardens Eye View, in New York State, U.S., learned to stick with garden centers and growers she knows don't use insecticides, herbicides, or chemical fertilizers. If there aren't pollinators hanging around the flowers before she purchases them, she'll be suspicious.

asters

Others who shared lessons in their comments included: Tammy at Casa Mariposa, learned that Flagstones are better for stepping stones than concrete because they don't leach lime. She also learned to go with her gut in the fall and make changes instead of second-guessing herself all winter. Endah at Endah Murniyati's Journey, learned that Tomatoes broken off at the base can regrow roots and produce plentiful fruits with a little extra care.

Paula at Blooms 'n' Spades learned it's OK to re-work your garden to match your vision. Janet at Plantaliscious learned that everything in her new garden home grows taller than advertised. Helene at Graphicality-UK learned that even when Tomato seedlings look small in July, they can still yield an incredible harvest by September.

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That's the wrap-up! Thanks to all who shared lessons and wisdom. If I forgot anyone with lessons to share, or you'd like to participate, please let me know and I'll add your lessons here. Happy autumn to those in the Northern Hemisphere, and happy spring to everyone in the Southern Hemisphere!

sunflowers

22 comments:

  1. Thank you for sharing me a lot of interesting lessons. That's really useful for me. The apples look so appetizing.
    have a wonderful week and happy gardening!

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    1. Thanks for joining in, Endah! The apples are looking good around here. I get such a taste for them in the fall, which makes sense, I guess. :) Happy gardening to you, too!

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  2. Wonderful! I love the apples that head up your post. My wisdom of the season arrives one day too late. Ah well, it fits the season. Meanwhile I enjoy all the rest with great pleasure.

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    1. Thanks, Susie. The apple trees were on a neighbor's property and they seemed like a good subject as I longingly looked at them across the yard on that blue-sky day. Yum! Never too late, Susie. Please share your wisdom at any time. :)

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  3. my potted to go plants are rewarding me with a first flower on the tall yellow bearded iris - a gift from my mother's gardening friend.

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    1. Yay! Bearded Irises are so stately. Lucky you to have Irises blooming now! And a gift from your mom's gardening friend--even better!

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  4. Always interesting to read these. Love your photos, too. I always look forward to finding the New England and Sky Blue Asters, but seems like I've been seeing a lot more Frost asters this year.

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    1. Thanks, Heather! The Asters were found along a hiking trail at a state natural area (we visited several this summer; not sure which one it was). When I was at the Arboretum on the weekend so many different types of Asters (and other flowers) were blooming. It was lovely.

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  5. Great wrap up to bring on fall Beth. I learned tomatoes will regrow as well but we won't get too much fruit if the weather isn't warm enough...cold and wet today but rest of the week is supposed to be great.

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    1. Thanks, Donna. Good point about the Tomatoes. Mine have definitely slowed down, as have the Cucumbers (which are usually cool weather veggies). I didn't grow any Peppers this year, but many people in the area are saying it wasn't a good year for Peppers. Oh well, every season is different. The Lettuces were great this year. :)

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  6. Wise words from wise people ! I have learned never to turn my back on a courgette because ,if you do, it will instantly morph into a marrow!

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    1. Yes, I agree, the wisdom of the participants is impressive! I had to chuckle at your comment and check on the meaning of the word marrow. I think it's the equivalent of what we call a gourd here in the U.S., and yes, you are wise not to turn your back. :)

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  7. Love your photos, blue sky and wrap up too!

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    1. Thanks, Lynne. The photos are simply random ones that haven't made it into any posts yet--mostly shots I took during hikes or away from my own garden. The hummingbird was here, though. I love autumn's blue skies!

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  8. Interesting wrap-up. Love the photo of apples.

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    1. Thank you. Yes, the apples are ripening and ready for harvest. I can't wait to get some for pies and other desserts and recipes. Plus, fresh and crunchy, too. :)

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  9. Thanks for hosting this once again, Beth! It's always surprising when I think back on a season just how many new lessons I've learned. That's what I enjoy about gardening--it's always changing.

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    1. Thank you for participating, Rose! Sometimes I think it's going to be hard to come up with lessons, but then when I think about it ... there are just so many all the time. I agree--gardening is the best hobby!

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  10. Great wrap-up, and I like the pictures too! Especially the New England Aster.

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    1. Thanks! Most of the photos were taken on hikes or at the cottage. Just some images that didn't make it into a post yet. Thanks for joining in the meme. :)

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  11. A late Happy Equinox to you! I love learning from other's garden adventures, while I get back to my own. Thanks for sharing. Lula

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  12. I suspect gardening helps keep us young at least at heard - or in mind? - because the learning never stops, does it. Thank you for the mention in your wrap-up!

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