June 23, 2014

Garden lessons beyond the solstice

Nellie1

It's two days past the solstice and I'm just now posting the Garden Lessons Learned wrap-up! I apologize and thank you for your patience!

Nellie2

One week ago today, we dropped off our daughter at O'Hare Airport for a summer job in Maine. And then the fishman and I spent a lovely week in Door County, Wis., to celebrate a landmark wedding anniversary. More botanical highlights from that trip to follow.

Nellie3

To avoid belaboring the point ... on to your lessons. Every quarter, gardeners around the world are invited to share garden lessons they've learned during the past season. Here are your highlights:

Donna at Gardens Eye View, in New York state, U.S., learned it's vital to take time for the important things in her life and her garden. Seeds sown now, with people and plants, often grow and blossom into lasting relationships.

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Rose at Prairie Rose's Garden, in Illinois, U.S., shared four wise lessons with special applications to the transitions between winter and spring, and then spring to summer. Her final lesson, about enjoying each day and each season for what it is, rings true.

Nellie5

Diana of Elephant's Eye, at Western Cape, South Africa, shared lessons learned time as she celebrates her five-year blogoversary. Lots of great tips and best practices for bloggers and gardeners. She photographed a beautiful wild orchid discovered while tending the lawn and potted for display.

Others with lessons added in their comments, included:

Helene at Graphicality-UK, learned that her garden has much better drainage than she thought, and that on rare frost-free London winters (like the past one), Fuchsias can survive year-round. Karin at Southern Meadows learned (as I did) that Butterfly Weed can take a while to establish, but takes off with vigor once it does.

Nellie6

Aaron at Garden of Aaron discovered that heavy pruning can be beneficial for some plants, including his Russian Sage and Caryopteris, while Crape Myrtles in their colder zones prefer a lighter pruning. Tammy at Casa Mariposa used grow lights more extensively this winter and found it to be a great substitute for outdoor gardening, and that Roses can withstand very heavy prunings.

Nellie7

Lynne at Irish Garden House learned that sometimes, when the winter is especially difficult and you wait all spring for plants to appear, at some point you might have to move on and add new plants in their place. Grace at Gardening With Grace released her ADGD (attention deficit gardening disorder), and her "watched plants" suddently emerged and grew fast. Jen at Muddy Boot Dreams noticed that many of her perennials were slow to emerge this spring because of the severe winter.

Nellie8

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That's the wrap-up! Thanks to all who shared lessons and wisdom. If I forgot anyone with lessons to share, or you'd like to participate, please let me know and I'll add your lessons here. Happy summer to those in the north, and I hope those in the Southern Hemisphere will have a peaceful, rewarding winter season!

Nellie9

19 comments:

  1. Thank you for the wrap up and the mention. Lovely photos . . Happy Anniversary

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    1. Thank you, Lynne. And thanks for joining in with your lovely comments.

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  2. Thanks for hosting this once again, Beth; love the transitional series of clematis blooms! And a very Happy Anniversary!

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    1. Thanks, Rose. The Clematises don't last long enough for me. They're so pretty for about three weeks and then they're gone. But the seed heads are pretty, too. :)

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  3. Lovely wrap up Beth and Happy Anniversary...I had family visiting this past week and as they left today I was so sad to see them go...

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    1. Thank you, Donna. I know what you mean. It was hard to say goodbye to my daughter once again, but I'm proud that she has wings. :)

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  4. Happy anniversary...
    I like the step by step series of this beautiful flower. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Thank you, Endah. Clematises are so pretty in every stage. I only wish they would last a little longer...

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  5. Lovely photos -- I look forward to seeing your postings from Door County.

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    1. Thank you, Heather. So much to cover about Door County! Lots of memories from childhood, too. Still a fabulous place for a summer vacation!

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  6. I love this clematis series! Just beautiful! Always lots of learning going on in the garden, such as never count on rain, even when you hear thunder. Sigh... Out to water!

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    1. Thank you, Tammy. Yes, I agree the precipitation issue is tough--it's always too little or too much. We've had too much lately--bad for the farmers, but my garden seems OK with it. Unfortunately the weeds like it, too. I hope you get some rain soon!

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  7. Beautiful photographic journey of the Clematis bloom. This was very enjoyable. I found you through Prairie Rose's Garden blog

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    1. Thank you! The Clematises entrance me--not just the blooms, but all the stages of development. Thanks for your kind comments and your visit!

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  8. one more for you.
    http://elephantseyegarden.blogspot.com/2014/06/fifth-blogaversary.html
    Strim thoughtfully, that grass ... may be a wild orchid.

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    1. Thanks for joining in, Diana. Wow, what a find! How's it doing as a potted plant?

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    2. I'm happy to see leaves coming up, flowers should follow later ...

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  9. Very cool photo series! Great job capturing every stage.

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    1. Thanks, Kathleen. So sad the Clematises are finished blooming for the year. I love them.

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