June 16, 2013

Perfect June blooms and foliage

peony

With the Peonies blooming (two weeks later than last year), it's a perfect day in my USDA zone 5 garden as I write this post for Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day (a day late!) and Foliage Follow-Up.

This is the time of year when I can't imagine a better place to be than right in my backyard. Of course, there are gardens 'round the world just as lovely (in fact, most are better maintained and much more impressive), but I'm perfectly contented in my little space during late spring/early summer. There's a light scent of Mock Orange in the air, it's warm enough for summer water sports but not too hot to sit outside comfortably, and the days are sunny (with occasional thunderstorms in the evening).

In addition to the Peonies, here are a few additional bloomers that captured my camera lens:

bleedingheart

Bleeding Hearts of various types (Lamprocapnos spectabilis, Dicentra formosa) are still blooming and quite lush and healthy this year.

euphorbia

Cushion Spurge (Euphorbia polychroma), though past its peak, is adding its chartreuse and yellow glow to the landscape.

salviaf

Purple Sage (Salvia nemerosa) is dominating the potager garden on the west side of the house, and attracting plentiful pollinators.

lantana

The Lantanas (L. camara) are beginning to "leap" after a slow, cold, wet start to the growing season.

allium

Drumstick Alliums (A. sphaerocephalon) are about to burst into bright purple puff balls.

mockorange

The sight and scent of the Mock Orange (Philadelphus) shrubs fill their own perfect corner of the garden.

rose

The fuchsia Roses of unknown classification (shown in this blog's top banner with their second, later season stage of blooms) are bright and healthy.

rosehosta

Transitioning to foliage, here we see the scale and contrast of the fuchsia Roses with their neighbor Hostas and Bishop's Weed.

epiyellow

epiwarley

My first Barrenworts (Epimedium 'Creeping Yellow' and E. warleyense) seem happy in their new home. I love the way their leaves sparkle and flutter when watered.

hops

The Golden Hops (Humulus lupulus 'Aureus') are filling in nicely on the obelisk.

coleus

Planters with my favorite Coleus mixes have a healthy start.

dogwood

Our new Dwarf Dogwood (Cornus pumila) shrubs are growing nicely and have unexpectedly lovely, veined chartreuse foliage.

succulents

And finally, my first succulent planters are holding their own, though they have some issues, which I plan to describe in a future post.

All in all, it's a great time to be in my garden. I plan to spend as much time out there as possible in the days ahead. Happy Bloom Day and Foliage Follow-Up, and thanks to Carol and Pam for hosting! (And Happy Father's Day!)

foxglove

Coming soon: The Garden Lessons Learned wrap-up. Please share a post or your thoughts about lessons you've learned during the past few months. To join in, click here to leave a comment with a link to your post. Thanks!

25 comments:

  1. Perfect Pink Peonie Picture . . . gorgeous. And Mock Orange . . . beautiful . . . one of two I am planning for spots in my gardens . . .
    Mock Orange and Honeysuckle . .

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    1. Thanks. I'm sure you know how wonderful Peonies are in person--when you can smell, touch, and really see them. They're so late this year, it's weird. But I'm sure enjoying them now!

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  2. Think your dwarf dogwood is showing early signs of chlorosis. Whether last year's drought or the very wet spring, a great many of my trees & shrubs are showing signs of chlorosis, from mild to major. A little foliar feed will help that clear up.

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    1. Gosh, thanks! I wondered if that foliage pattern was "normal" or a sign of a problem. I suppose a cold, wet spring didn't help either? We will treat them. Thanks so much!

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  3. Your Philadelphus is really floriferous! Lots of nice foliage, have you tried making tea out of the Epimedium? The fuchsia colored rose is rather unusual with the notched petals. I love Lantana but I haven't tried growing it as an annual. Do you overwinter it or start over the next year?

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    1. We have two Philadelphus shrubs, planted side by side at the corner of our lot, draping near the rock garden. I swoon when they're in full bloom--especially during a spring like this one with plentiful rain and sun. I can't seem to ID the Rose--maybe someone will tell me. This is the first year I've tried Lantana--it's doing better now with a little heat and humidity.

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    2. Oh, and no, I haven't tried the Epimedium Tea--I didn't know you could. :)

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  4. I have wanted a Philadelphus for years, but I can't for my life find a space for it in my garden! That salmon coloured Dicentra was an unusual colour, lovely! And I also love coleus, for some reason I didn't get around to buy any this year, they are annuals in my garden, I suppose they are in yours too, so need to be replaced every year. I need to get some next year :-)
    Loved the photo of the foxglove, just stunning, well all the photos are stunning!

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    1. Thanks, Helene! Ah, I definitely recommend Mock Orange! The draping branches are great for floral arrangements, too. Yes, the Dicentra is kind of understated next to the other Bleeding Hearts, but it's really special close-up. Like you, I grow the Coleus as annuals. They're inexpensive seedlings, and they grow really well in my shady garden! I was sad to clip off the remaining Foxglove blooms, but hopefully they'll bloom again in fall. It was nice to have them in a vase for a couple of days. :)

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  5. Oh, my - I hope my peonies will actually bloom for me some day! Such beautiful blooms. And your rose is so pretty. I love that color. I also like variegation of the bishop's weed - it looks great poking through the hosta. I know what you mean about being in the garden. I would rather be in my garden than anywhere else, weeds and all. :)

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    1. Thanks, Holley. Unfortunately, because the Peonies bloomed late during a heat wave, they're almost fini for the summer. On the bright side, we now have a couple of mild days so the Mock Oranges are holding their blooms longer. Yay! I would rather be in my garden than just about anywhere else from May through October. Then, not so much. ;-)

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  6. Lots of beautiful blooms. I adore your peonies and bleeding hearts. The succulent planters are lovely. That top shot of the allium is unique and ah how refreshing with the last shot of water and the foxgloves.

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    1. Thanks, Donna. I'm hoping the Foxgloves will bloom again in the fall. They were great to have around for a few weeks. But then I clipped off the tops to encourage repeat blooms.

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  7. Everything looks wonderful and very seasonal!!

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    1. Thanks, Lula! This is a good time of year to be in this part of the world. ;-)

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  8. hi beth, it's a cliche, but when I read the introduction to this post, I thought, there is no place like home. It sounds as if you're having a gentle delicious summer. The photo of the allium from that angle is amazing, as if it's suspended in space, and I can almost smell the heavy perfume of the mock orange.

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    1. Yes, I agree about the "no place like home" sentiment. I struggled with how to capture the Alliums because they kind of get lost against other foliage/plants if photographed from the side--until they bloom, and then the color form will be more impressive. The Mock Oranges on our lot are the lightly scented ones. I'm not exactly sure of the species, but it might be P. lewisii or P. x virginalis. It's a very faint, but sweet scent. :)

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  9. Your blooms and foliage are looking great! I envy you your mock orange. There's a hedge of it I walk by on the way to the office and the fragrance is heavenly. I also grow variegated Bishop's Weed. I know it is supposed to be so terribly invasive but I haven't had much trouble with it. I'm careful to always remove the flower stalks, though.

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    1. The Mock Oranges are wonderful--I must admit they're among my faves. We have lightly scented ones, but they're pretty special. Yeah, I've had the same experience with the Bishop's Weed. We simply mow around it and have no problems. Maybe it would be more of a problem in a warmer climate?

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  10. There is nowhere more wonderful than visiting our own gardens. It's hard to leave them this time of year. Yours is blooming right along!~~Dee

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    1. So true, Dee. It seems I come to a time in late spring and early summer, when all I want to do is take it all in--with a little maintenance and weeding thrown in, of course. ;-)

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  11. Your garden is looking splendid! I love that time of year when it is warm enough but not to hot! Love your succulent planters and can't wait to read more about them!

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    1. My favorite time of year. Now I'm dreaming of a day at the lake or in a pool. Nothing like the warm summer days (before it gets too hot)! I do have some interesting stories about the succulent/rock planters. Plenty of fodder for blog posts. ;-)

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  12. Everything looks great! This is my favorite time of year too, I wish it would stay just like this all year round (minus the mosquitoes!) You have many of the same blooms as I do right now. Everything is so late.

    Amy

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    1. Unfortunately, most of the blooms on this post (except the Lantanas and the Alliums) are now fading. But the foliage remains! And new flowers are appearing! I love spring and summer! Amen to the mosquitoes!

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