April 30, 2013

Wordless emerging ephemerals

Sanguinaria canadensis
Sanguinaria canadensis

Enemion biternatum
Enemion biternatum

Claytonia virginica
Claytonia virginica

Trillium erectum
Trillium erectum

Podophyllum peltatum
Podophyllum peltatum

36 comments:

  1. such a lovely photos you've got there.. ;)


    Happy Wordless Wednesday! My entry is here.

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    1. Thanks, Raquel. The strawberry crepes on your Wordless Wednesday post made me hungry! I think I'll make some for lunch! Thanks for stopping by.

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  2. You sure take beautiful pictures! So exciting to see the plants starting to awaken and head into spring!

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    1. Thank you, Christy! The plants are so photogenic, it makes documenting them easy. The Great White Trilliums (as shown in my avatar) are starting to bloom today. Everything is happening so fast now.

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  3. Looks like spring! So exciting!

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    1. Yes, it's one of the best months to be in Wisconsin (although we have a couple of unusually cold days to get through). Everything is blooming at once because of the delayed spring.

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  4. The emergence of life at last...so very lovely. Happy spring! These are lovely images that display all that beauty at this time of year.

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    1. Thanks, Michelle. It is a magical time--the ephemerals are incredible. Usually their emergence is more staggered, but this year, they're showing up all at the same time!

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  5. Don't you just love these early wildflowers...I am noticing them all along my route to work...trilliums and trout lilies especially. Great to see spring has arrived.

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    1. Yes, they're incredible. I don't have any Trout Lilies here, but I've noticed them at state parks and other locations. The Great White Trilliums should about full peak this weekend!

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  6. Great pictures! The buds and leaves are just as lovely as the flower.

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    1. Thanks, Jason! I agree--the foliage and the buds are fascinating. I should have posted a closed Bloodroot bud because I think they're more fascinating in that stage. But that particular bloom with the cupped leaves won me over.

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  7. Great photography - nice to see spring has arrived for you!

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    1. Thanks, Angie. Spring is on steroids now--everything is happening all at once, and I'm way behind with my garden chores!

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  8. I loved seeing these old friends perennials...I should look up and see how many will survive in this climate...love them.

    Before I forget, we laughed over your comment about almost anything tasting better with butter and garlic, and totally agree.

    The farm grows over 50 acres? I think of asparagus, and they still can't keep up with the demand.

    Jen

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    1. I would think some of these wildflowers are native to your area, too. And most should be happy in your climate. Regarding the Asparagus--I truly never liked it until I sauteed it in butter and garlic, and now I'm looking forward to this year's crop from my farm share. I enjoyed your adventures in the Asparagus field. Careful!

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  9. Lovely photos, as always :-) Great to see spring has arrived for you, love your collection of spring flowers, especially the trillium.
    My only single Trillium luteum got broken, probably by a cat jumping from the fence - could even have been my cat, now it probably won't come back for years....I have loads of Trillium cuneatum though, but the luteum was just one single plant, typical that it was this one that broke!

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    1. Thank you, Helene. Trilliums, I guess obviously, are among my favorites. The Great Whites (T. grandiflorum) are just starting to bloom--it's a special time of year when they dot the landscape. I didn't plant any of these ephemerals--they grow naturally in the woods behind my house. Sorry about the T. luteum. Maybe it will surprise you and put on another show next spring. I know your Trillium collection is impressive!

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  10. oh ~ it's spring! I'm SO jealous!!!

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    1. Oh dear. Sorry about all the snow, but soon enough you will have amazing perfect summer weather. I'll be jealous of your dry 70s and 80s, while I'm sweating in the 90s. I'm sending warm thoughts your way!

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  11. You've captured those beautiful moments when new robust growth emerges from the earth. Jut gorgeous, my dear. Wish could comment via email.

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    1. Thanks! The ephemerals and so beautiful and photogenic, so it's a pleasure. My email address is on my sidebar.

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  12. Spring finally! Your plants are so pretty in their freshly emerged state.

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    1. Yes, spring is in full swing now, finally. So much gardening and so many chores to catch up on. Thanks, Shirley.

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  13. Mayapple is out in force here too. Bloodroot has not flowered yet that I have seen, at least in the park. Our garden club has a native garden and it might be blooming there. Nice photos of all the ephemerals.

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    1. Thank you, Donna. Some of the Bloodroot plants didn't bloom this year, but others did. I'm thinking maybe last year's drought shifted things a bit.

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    1. Nifty plant, isn't it?! Like little umbrellas popping out of the soil. They seem very happy this year--plenty of precipitation, I guess.

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  15. Beautiful photos, Beth! Looks like your hours working on your Master Naturalist course is giving you a great opportunity to see some wildflower beauties.

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    1. Thank you, Rose! Actually, these plants are in the forest behind my house. I see them every spring back there. But, yes, the MN classes are great for various reasons. Really getting a lot out of it!

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  16. Your wordless "speaks" to me. Lovely!

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    1. Thanks, Carolyn. It's a special time of year. :)

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  17. They've come and gone! But what a beautiful moment they provide!

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    1. Yes, spring is too fleeting, but wonderfully magical, isn't it?

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  18. I love your photos of the hickory bud emerging... What kind of lens did you use to capture them? Spring ephemerals have come and gone here... It's nice to see them again virtually. You are so right about how fast the garden changes this time of year.

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    1. Thank you, Sheila. I use several cameras, but the one I use most in the garden is an Olympus with a macro setting. It also has a 22X digital zoom, which works OK, but I need to use a tripod to keep it steady. So actually one of my other cameras is better for landscape shots.

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