January 07, 2013

We have roots!

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The Holly is long gone, the decorations are put away, and the Christmas cookies have been devoured. But the Ivy still lives!

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wreath

One of my recent posts about Holly and Ivy showed how to make a very simple holiday wreath. On Dec. 6, I placed a few cuttings of Ivy from my front porch planters, along with some store-bought Holly, into a Grape vine wreath.

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I placed the clipped ends of the Ivy into a floral water tube (which you can buy at most floral supply or craft stores).

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I tucked the water tube into the wreath. (It's barely visible, and was even less so with Holly covering it.)

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I had simply hoped to keep it alive through the holidays. But lo and behold, more than a month later and after a few water changes ... we have roots!

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I think I'll keep the Ivy going as long as possible in the wreath. Later, I might stick it in a pot with soil for an indoor plant. Or, if it holds on long enough, I'll plant it outside in May.

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I wonder if the Ivy in the outdoor pots (still evergreen and alive under the snow and ice!) will survive the next several weeks of winter ...

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(I'm linking in a little late with Garden Bloggers' Harvest Day at The Gardening Blog.)

32 comments:

  1. What a nice idea!! I love your simple wreath! I hope your ivy in the outdoor pots will survive:)

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    1. Any plant that is this hardy has my respect. I know it can be invasive in some climates and settings, but in a pot or as a houseplant it has my vote!

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  2. I love the variegated ivy and your holiday wreath idea. For some reason last year I did not plant any ivy in pots and will remedy that since I find it very hardy...how fun to find a wonderful surprise!

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    1. Thanks, Donna! I've planted Ivy in outdoor pots before, but I just let it go without moisture during the winter. I think it will survive with water and snow, but if not it's a fun experiment!

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  3. Amazing! Some plants are just natural survivors. I'm going to have to remember to add some ivy to my containers outdoors this spring.

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    1. I know--one less plant I have to buy for my pots next spring. It seems incredibly hardy!

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    1. Yeah, it seems like it's hard to kill. Amazing.

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  5. Oh, I hope it makes it until May so you can plant it out! How fun!

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  6. Your outdoor ivy should survive. Mine (was variegated, but reverted) has and now I have to do something to contain it. It is extremely vigorous. The wreath is very pretty. It will look lovely filled in.

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    1. Thanks. I'm not sure the wreath will fill in much, but the cutting might survive for a while and grow more roots if I keep changing the water. I've always enjoyed Ivy.

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  7. The frequent cry at our house is "Life will not be denied!" Works for you too.

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    1. That's a good one! It sure is a hopeful sentiment, too. Thanks!

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  8. Some plants survive whatever you throw at them! I must admit ivy is a pest and a problem in my garden, it seeds from neighbouring unkempt gardens and I am forever picking up ivy seedlings from the flower beds. It turns out ivy doesn't need any soil at all to grow, it can germinate and grow happily just on bark chippings, and it does it very well in my garden! Good luck with your plant, it is a tough one, so should survive :-)

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    1. Yeah, I guess it can be a pest. I've seen it take over the sides of houses around here even. But I've never planted it in the ground--just in pots. I didn't know it would grow on bark chips without soil--wow!

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  9. That's great news, there doesn't seem to be lots of ivy around here, could be too cold, and to dry. On the coast it grew everywhere....

    I will be thinking of you in the sun, and warmth...lol.

    Jen

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    1. It gets pretty cold and dry here, too. But I think Ivy just goes dormant then. When I've planted it in pots on the porch, it just died because of lack of water and because of severe cold. Yes, sun and warmth in March will be nice. ;)

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  10. It is always fun when something grows unexpectedly in the winter. I even grew sprouting pearl onions to produce scallions to harvest.

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    1. Yes, Scallions are amazing in winter, aren't they?! I always have a few Onions that go to seed, and when the snow isn't too deep I always have a plentiful supply of Scallions.

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  11. That is a great idea and so lovely. I love ivy in planters, and it looks so pretty around that wreath. And it is such a lovely variety, too. Happy new year!

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    1. Thanks, Michelle. It's so fun when experiments work well. Happy New Year!

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  12. I love it when plants you think will die prove you wrong by growing. I like how feisty nature is. Love your ivy wreath! :o)

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    1. Yeah, the feistiness of it all is so encouraging. Thanks!

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  13. What a lovely unexpected bonus, that ivy definitely deserves to be kept going.

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  14. that's fun! My bits in our glass Advent wreath often root over those 4 weeks.

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    1. So fun to watch, isn't it? I'm going to have to try this again next Advent!

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  15. Your blog is very nice. Plants are very different. Then I will follow you. Greetings.

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  16. Liz, have done the same with some of my decorations and I couldn't help to keep them because there were alive, Very nice wreath and great idea to keep it alive! lula

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    1. Sometimes the inspiration hits and it works out...sometimes, not so much. But it's fun to experiment. ;-)

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