December 12, 2012

Winter's rest is spring's promise

promise

29 comments:

  1. It is amazing how the plants are fooled into putting on new growth in December wit the crazy weather...it does feel like spring today :)

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    1. Yes, unfortunately those leaf tips are doomed as soon as we get our first major cold snap. The same thing happened last year to this Hydrangea. By the end of winter, the early leaves were withered and brown. But the plant came back just fine. I think the drought was harder on it than the subzero weather!

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  2. I love the wing like expressiveness.

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    1. Yeah, that caught my eye, too. It's kind of sad because the leaves won't last long when it gets really cold. :(

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    1. Thank you, Dana! For the past two years, this Hydrangea at the corner of the house foundation has put out early leaves, only to have them wither in January. But I find it fascinating.

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  4. I must keep remembering that. I want spring to hurry, and we just now are having winter.~~Dee

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    1. I don't mind a month of winter, but February and March just drag on... We could use some precipitation--either in snow or rain form. Sounds like your area could use it, too?

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  5. Here the weather has been pretty warm for December and many plants are not fully dormant. I too like your title.

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    1. Thanks, Donna. It feels like deja-vu. Same thing happened last year, and then we had a horrible drought. I hope that doesn't happen again. I wouldn't mind a little snow!

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  6. This new growth remember me the ballet dancer! Waiting for spring.

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    1. Yeah--I think so, too! It's so fascinating to see buds form and break...even when it's premature.

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  7. like everyone's said, lovely poetic title, and concept. something magical about the photo, reminds me of a totem pole.

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    1. Thanks! Everything is grey and white in the landscape. But when you look closely, there are buds forming. And some, like this one, are breaking prematurely.

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  8. I find myself wishing for some normal winter weather, I find the current warmth discomforting. When it comes I will want spring. I guess I am never satisfied.

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    1. Me, too. And I never thought I would say that. But the warm winter last year was followed by terrible heat and drought. And I really hope that doesn't happen again.

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  9. As soon as the leaves start falling, I begin to dream of spring! Today i saw the first tip of a daffodil beginning to push up through the soil. Too soon; we are sure to have some freezing temps, though I have seen daffodils blooming as early as late January here.

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    1. Wow--I think your spring happens way before ours. Although I noticed the Hellebores are emerging, and around here they usually wait to emerge until March, and then bloom in April. I hope they'll be OK under the leaves and snow! Daffodils in January would be wild!

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  10. What an appropriate title! I'm surprised by touches of green here and there in my garden right now as well.

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    1. I know, and now we're supposed to get quite a snowstorm on Thursday. Folks around here are reporting Hellebores and Snowdrops in bloom, which is way too early for our climate. I noticed my Hellebores are budding. If I pulled off the leaf mulch, they would probably bloom. But I'm hoping I can delay them.

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    1. Thanks, Janet. It is beautiful, isn't it? The buds are doomed, but lovely in a tragic way. We are about to get a cold, snowy blast of winter...

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  12. So very true!! I am no longer a NO on the Italy trip! I might be a YES! I can only go after the middle of June since that's when we start winter break. Excited!! :o)

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    1. Yay! It would be so, so fun to have you along on the trip, Tammy! Soon after the holidays, we'll start planning the details of the trip, and you'll hear more about it soon since you're on the list. Cheers!

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  13. Lovely shot, my hydrangeas look the same, but they survive the winter as the temperature isn't too low. My daffodils and irisis are already poking through :-)

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    1. Wow, Daffodils and Irises in December! Well, at least the foliage, right? I need to take a walkaround and find out what's poking through here. I noticed the Hellebores are budding under the leaves, but I don't want to encourage them because we have a long winter ahead!

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  14. Please spring, keep that promise, come March I will be holding you to it.

    Jen

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    1. Yes, me too, Jen. :) By March we'll be stir-crazy, right? I'm amazed at how many plants have little seedlings sprouting--just in time for a 12-inch snowstorm on Thursday!

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  15. I used to have hollyhocks but they long since disappeared. I wil hav e to replant. I do remember problems with rust.

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