June 06, 2012

Seasonal celebrations: the plants of summer!

Ah, summertime! As a child in Indiana, and later in northern Wisconsin, I always looked forward to summertime. It was my favorite season, and I guess it still is!

There's nothing better than spending a day at the lake or in the pool with family and close friends. So as I write this Seasonal Celebrations post to join in with Donna's excellent meme, I'm looking forward to some quality time on the water.

This is, however, a blog about plants. So to tie it all together, here's a list of some of my favorite summertime plants:


Daylilies: Mine are starting to bloom, and I've noticed other bloggers posting about their Daylilies, too. If you don't have Daylilies in your garden, I highly recommend them. With minimal care, they provide pops of color on hot summer days when other plants aren't as showy.


Black Raspberries: I can't wait to pick 'em and bake with 'em! We have a sizable patch up at our vacation property. They're so sweet and tasty—whether consumed fresh or in berry desserts.


Roses: I don't have many Roses in my garden, but they certainly signify summer for me. In this northern climate, the season for Roses is way too short! I'm researching organic pest control for Roses so I can add more to my garden.


Hydrangeas: They're about to bloom! That must sound so funny to some of you who've had blooming Hydrangeas for several weeks now. Actually, mine are early like everything else, and the bushes sure are healthy and lush this year!


Cosmos, Zinnias, Snapdragons, and Liatris: It will be a while before my cut flower garden produces enough blooms for a bouquet. But all of a sudden after a few hot days, I'll walk out into the garden in the morning and harvest a bucketful! I can't wait!

Ah, summertime! Now if you'll excuse me, I'm off to enjoy a cool iced Tea on the veranda...


 ~ 

Please join in the “Lessons Learned” meme by including a link to your post in the comments. Or, you can click on the “Lessons Learned” tab at the top of this page. The Mr. Linky widget will be live until the solstice—when I’ll do a wrap-up post about all our lessons. And join Donna at Garden's Eye View for “Seasonal Celebrations.” You can combine the two in one post, or link to them separately.

22 comments:

  1. I love your celebration Beth and thx for participating...what would summer be without water especially for us Indiana girls. I am looking forward to all the same flowers but alas I fear my hydrangea are not going to produce much this year...last year was their year...but the roses are taking their place. We may be getting our first blackberries this year...yummy...I had a bit of a set back so my lessons learned will be posted later next week. Here's to a wonderful summer.

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    1. Thanks for hosting, Donna! I'm never sure what to expect from the Hydrangeas. We'll have to share Indiana stories one of these days. Cheers!

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  2. Love all those summer blooms, especially the orange daylily. When I visit Michigan in the summer and see them growing along the roadside it just makes me smile! Last weekend I was in North Carolina and they had mass plantings of daylilies along the interstate. It was very impressive! Nice to see your pink hydrangea. We usually only get blue bloom since our soil is so acidic.

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    1. Thanks, Karin! I know some people consider Daylilies one step shy of weeds, but I appreciate them because of their reliability and ease of care. I think that Hydrangea is a 'Nikko Blue' oddly enough. The instructions said to add acid fertilizer to the soil, but I like the pink. They're planted next to the foundation of the house where the soil is alkaline. One year, they were a mix of pink and blue--I love that!

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  3. You've picked many of my summer favorites, too, Beth. It's funny,though, I have only one daylily blooming so far, though the ditch lilies along the roadsides are in full bloom already. Continuing with the "it's been a strange year" theme, I have one hydrangea just loaded with blooms while the other, the same cultivar, has none. Of course, the second one also didn't get covered during the April frosts, so it's still recovering.

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    1. That's interesting, Rose. I didn't cover my Hydrangeas at all, although they're next to the house which might keep them a little warmer. These photos are from last year, but all the flowers mentioned are just about to bloom. My Daylilies seemed like they were struggling a little bit, too. But I watered them thoroughly and they seem to be recovering. Phwew!

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  4. There is something really happy about cosmos and they definitely say summer to me.

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    1. I agree, Donna. They look so fragile and frilly--but they're actually quite sturdy. A handful of them in a glass canning jar is such a simple, happy thing to have on the table!

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  5. Our climates are very different, and yet many of your plants are so familiar to me. Daylilies, Roses and Cosmos are such adaptable plants. In 6 months they'll be saying Summer to me too!

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    1. It's somehow comforting to know that some plants thrive nearly anywhere. Hope your autumn/winter is treating you well. :)

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  6. Your garden is a little faster then ours...most of what you have blooming is only a promise for us so far.

    But I can wait, it will be worth it.

    Jen @ Muddy Boot Dreams

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    1. I must admit that most of these plants (except for the Roses, which are in full bloom) are just starting to bloom for me. The photos are from last year, but I'm looking ahead to the fun! Enjoy your summer blooms, too, Jen!

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  7. Nice choices! I love summer too ~ look forward to it all year then it always goes by way too fast. Ice tea on the veranda sounds wonderful. We spend a lot of time in the lake too so I know what you mean about that.

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    1. Yes, it goes way too fast! Our growing season is a little longer this year, but the warm weather is still too short. Enjoy your sunny days!

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  8. Still digesting the spectacle of your peonies and now your summer show is setting off. Here we are in a monsoon season instead of flaming June.

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    1. Thanks, Laura! Yes, sorry to hear about all your rain. I hope it lets up in time for the Olympics! We've been a bit dry here, so I've been hauling water for all the tender plants. The perennials can take care of themselves, but the vegs need help.

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  9. Early summer time in your garden is amazing!
    Ciao!

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    1. Ciao, Dona! And thank you! I really can't complain this time of year--except it's so nice I'm finding it hard to sneak away for computer time.

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  10. Sorry for being absent for such a long time, I am slowly trying to catch up with things, visiting your blog included :-)

    Beth, you are one of my favourite bloggers, so I want to nominate you for the Illuminating Blogger Award for illuminating, informative blog content.
    Here are the details:
    http://foodstoriesblog.com/illuminating-blogger-award/

    Awards like this one are a nice way link blogs and meet other bloggers :-)

    Take care.

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    1. Thank you, Helene! I'm so honored! Don't worry about keeping up with blog visits--you are recuperating! Take care of yourself. I hope the rain lets up a bit and your recovery speeds up. Rest well.

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  11. I enjoyed seeing your favorite summer plants. Those berries sure look yummy! I'm thinking those are at your vacation place. What about the flowers? How much time do you spend at your vacation home?

    Some of my daylilies look distressed, with browning leaves, and some of the buds are shriveling. Have you had that happen? How often do you divide yours?

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    1. Hi Sue: Yes, the berries are up at the cottage. They grow naturally there. I don't do a lot of gardening there because we're there sporadically. Some of my Daylilies were looking distressed too-- but a chipmunk was burrowing under them. I plugged up the hole, watered them thoroughly, and now they seem to be doing well. Good luck!

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