May 14, 2012

May in the Midwest


If you're considering a trip to the Midwestern U.S., May is generally a good weather bet. If you're able to spend a few days, you'll likely encounter a little rain, mild temperatures, and impressive plant life. Everything is green and growing and many of our prettiest perennials are blooming.

For this Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day and Foliage Follow-Up, there are plenty of plants to showcase in my garden, including several that I hadn't captured with my camera until now. Among bloomers, that includes Viburnum, Cotoneaster, Wild Geranium, and Fern-Leaf Bleeding Heart.


Viburnum opulus

Cotoneaster horizontalis

Geranium maculatum

Dicentra eximia

Some plants have been blooming for weeks on end, including Vinca, which I posted about in March, Dwarf Korean Lilac, and the more common Bleeding Heart, Dicentra Spectablis, in pink and white.

Vinca minor

Syringa meyeri

Dicentra spectabilis

Of course, Lamium can be counted on to bloom most of the growing season.

Lamium maculatum

A few other highlights include a few remaining Lilies-of-the-Valley, the waning Cushion Spurge, and the always-dramatic Jack-in-the-Pulpit.

Convallaria majalis

Euphorbia polychroma

Arisaema tryphyllum

The foliage is nearly as fascinating as flowers this month, including several I hadn't photographed beforeRocket Ligularia, Cranberry Bush Virburnum, Oak Fern, and the foliage of Dicentra eximia.

Ligularia stenocephala

Viburnum opulus

Gymnocarpium dryopteris

Dicentra eximia

Solomon's Seal currently resembles an Asiatic Lily, but it's really all foliage. The flowers will appear where the buds are nowalong the stems in clusters.

Polygonatum biflorum

Mayapples are past their prime and some animal or human has been rooting around in my patch, possibly looking for Morels? Still, Mayapples are always fascinating plants to view.

Podophyllum peltatum

And then, of course, there are the Hostas. I know many people tire of Hostas, but they frame my garden nicely and come in numerous varieties and sizes.





If you're wondering what the white, fuzzy stuff is sticking to my plants, it's Cottonwood seeddropping early, like everything else this season. It's a nuisance, but kind of fascinating in that it resembles snow among the green, growing landscape.



Happy Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day and Foliage Follow-Up. And thanks to Carol and Pam for hosting!

26 comments:

  1. How interesting that so many plants that are in full bloom or just past their prime are just getting started here...Mayapples are impressive and not blooming yet and neither are the hardy geraniums to name a few....no bleeding hearts still...rotten April weather.

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    1. That is so wild, Donna. I guess it was the warm March we had--it was summertime here for about two weeks straight. And then we flirted with hard freezes in April, but never got cold enough for petal drops. Now you have so much to look forward to!

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  2. Hello Liz, thanks for your comment to my lat post. I moved to a new home and it's been really complicated the past two months, but I am organizing getting back to blogging normal and ypu will see my garden, at last!!!! Congrats on being 52 garden blog finalist, great !

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    1. Thanks! Oh, how fun--sorry things have been so complicated, but I can't wait to see your garden! Congrats to you, too, Lula!

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  3. Your garden seems so lush and colorful. And I am glad you featured some of your beautiful hostas...gorgeous. My Solomon's Seal has finished blooming, but I enjoy seeing their spread each year. Happy GBBD!

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    1. Thanks! Wow, you're way ahead of me with the Solomon's Seal! Happy GBBD to you, too!

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  4. Beth what beautiful foliage! Love this time of year for all the juicy greeness around. Lovely pics! Also, I've nominated you for a sunshine blogger award, I love your blog and have always appreciate your support! Cheers Julia =)

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    1. Thanks, Julia, you are so kind! You remind me--I forgot to put the Sunshine badge on my sidebar. I posted about it here: http://bit.ly/IWV1q5.

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  5. Lovely photos from your garden, with lots of plants I also have in my garden - just not in flower yet! My Dicentra is flowering though, but I got it earlier this year so it is still in a pot so perhaps that doesn't count! Its flowers are red, bright red, never seen that before, so I just had to have one of course! My hostas are barely up above ground, nice to see your collection :-)

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    1. So strange--as I recall you were way ahead of me last spring! I didn't realize both of our climates varied so much. Maybe we'll both have normal springs next year. Thanks, Helene!

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  6. I've never seen the cottonwood seed in drifts like that. Thanks for showing it. Love your greens with the flowers. Beautiful blooms. I almost showed the cotoneaster blooms. They are delicate and lovely when viewed up close. Mine are still tight in bud as are yours.

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    1. Yeah, the Cottonwood is a mess, frankly. Not looking so nice for when company comes over after the graduation this weekend. Thanks for your kind words, Layanee.

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  7. I love those hostas and wish I could grow them. Beautiful leaf texture and coloration!

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    1. I just figured everyone could grow Hostas. They're so thick here--it must be the right spot for them. Generally, I take them for granted.

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  8. I love your hostas! I put a few in my FF post too, I would have done more, but I was worried people would find them ordinary. Your flowers and foliage are beautiful, especially that jack in the pulpit.

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    1. Thanks, Alison. After my son's graduation this weekend, I hope to find some time to visit blogs a little more and I will visit yours. It's funny how some people aren't crazy about Hostas. I'm almost embarrassed to mention them in my posts.

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  9. You obviously don't have slugs over there! We have MONSTER slugs that shred Ligularia faster than you can reach for the Sluggo.
    Great photos.

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    1. Thanks, Karen. We do have some slugs, but maybe not too many in the bed with the Ligularia. They're kind up on a hill, so the bed probably drains a little better than a low-lying garden would. Good to know that slugs can be a problem!

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  10. That Jack-in-the-pulpit photo is stunning!!!
    Everything looks so lush and beautiful there right now ~ it does seem like a good time to visit!

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    1. Thanks, Kathleen! Yes, the only thing I have to complain about in the garden/weather right now is the Cottonwood. It's a real mess! Oh well, not much I can do about it. Looking forward to a thunderstorm/heavy rain to wash it all away! :)

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  11. How much land do you have? You must have a zillion ferns planted! It's all so beautiful and lush! I love the jack in the pulpit. Such a cool plant!

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    1. Tee hee! We have about 1/4 acre. I'm so fortunate that the previous owners invested in excellent plant selection and landscaping. All the Hostas were here when we moved in. I've divided them a few times and given some away, but I haven't added any new ones. The Jack plants are nifty, aren't they?!

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  12. Everything looks so nice and green in your garden this month. That is quite a stand of Dicentra! And I love seeing the first photo of your garden with the swing. I love the last hosta best... I have one but I seem to let it always get covered with forget-me-nots and it does not appreciate it!

    We are still two weeks ahead, with our roses just about to burst. And yet the bleeding hearts are still holding a few flowers... very odd year.
    Happy May~
    Julie

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    1. Thanks, Julie! It sounds like we're about on the same schedule. Roses are starting to bloom here, and the Dicentras just keep going! The funny thing is my Peonies are right on schedule--they must bloom based on length of daylight rather than temperatures. Weird year, but interesting.

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  13. We are blessed with many of the same loves and garden goodies ... some of my Jack's are 2 feet tall and becoming a bit of a pest and have to be moved as 'reverted' lamium shoots that are very troublesome and impossible to control, choking out precious wildflowers like orchid Lady's Slippers (do you have that issue too). Your gardens are lovely ... lovely!

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    1. Thanks, Joey! Yes, some of the Jacks seem to be volunteering in spots where I didn't see them before. But I love them. The Lamium isn't too much of a problem because I have it in a confined spot. It's not too difficult to pull it where I don't want it. Woodland gardens are challenging, but fascinating, aren't they?!

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